Listen to 405 Radio
  • No Events

    We'll get something in the diary soon

The Black Keys - El Camino

The Black Keys - El Camino

by , 05 December 2011

Let's get one thing clear from the start. This is not Brothers. Don't be expecting such an accessible album. If all your love of The Black Keys is based on that album and not their earlier releases, you can skip straight to the last paragraph and make your mind up about whether you'll be purchasing this album.

Now that's out of the way, let's get on with a review the eleven track El Camino. Opener 'Lonely Boy' is the lead single and a great example of what the expect from the album. Heading back to the Wild West of Ohio with more than a touch of the blues, this could easily have come off The Big Come Up if it wasn't for the professional, high quality production. Dan Auerbach's voice is perfect for this type of track

As you delve further into the album, the occasional stand out track pops up. 'Sister' and 'Stop Stop' are both classic Black Keys and slightly poppy. Even on these songs though the blues sound is never far away. 'Hell of a Season' is an absolutely brilliant way to spend 3 minutes 45 seconds of your life. I almost want to write a screenplay right now just so that I can see it translated onto the big screen and feature a scene summing up what happened during my fictional Autumn scored by this very track.

This is a good album. As good as the wonderful Brothers? No. Longer term fans will love this. Completists will want this. I love this. I want this. Brothers just made me love The Black Keys even more than I already did. The key there though is "already did". If you "already did" love them, you'll love this. If you loved Brothers, but didn't really get turned on when you explored their back catalogue, you're probably not going to love this. This is The Black Keys though. This is what they're good at, and why they'll continue to make fantastic music. If I was giving this a mark out of ten for myself, it would be a couple of points higher. For a mark on a digital music magazine read by many though, it can be regarded as nothing more than above average.

Rating: 6.5/10

Purchase and listen

Don't Miss Out

Related Reviews

  • Suzanne Ciani - Lixiviation

    Suzanne Ciani - Lixiviation

    by Chris Woolfrey

    Music being non-figurative, you can put it in all kinds of contexts, and Lixiviation is a grand example of just that ability to shift. A retrospective compilation of Suzanne Ciani’s early sonic experiments and corporate work, it contains a beguiling mixture of lush electronic soundscapes of pulsating synth-hearts and windy breaths ('Paris 1'; 'Princess with Orange Feet') as well as short and terse marketing messages in the form of music. [read more]

  • Jim White - Where It Hits You

    Jim White - Where It Hits You

    by Jonathan Greer

    Jim White is an interesting character. Having severed his ties with David Byrne's Luaka Bop label, he has funded the release of this new album by embarking on a Kickstarter campaign in which he offered backers deluxe editions for their dollars in advance, as well as an expensive yard-clearing, lawn-mowing service coupled with a performance in your home, for those who paid the premium amounts. [read more]

  • School of Seven Bells – Ghostory

    School of Seven Bells – Ghostory

    by Toby McCarron

    This third record <em>Ghostory</em> from much praised New York outfit <strong>School of Seven Bells</strong> sees the band finding a new headspace. The now two piece (Member Claudia Deheza left in 2010 for personal reasons) comprised of Benjamin Curtis and Alejandra Deheza’s new record was recorded in a much more intimate manner than previous albums, with increased collaboration on ideas and recording which is evident in Ghostory’s tight considered sound. [read more]

  • Laura Gibson – La Grande

    Laura Gibson – La Grande

    by Rob Hollamby

    It’s fitting that Laura Gibson’s latest effort La Grande, her second full length and follow up to 2009’s Beasts of Seasons, is named after a small town in her native Oregon. Like recent tourmates (and grizzled travellers themselves) Richmond Fontaine, the music of Gibson and La Grande is firmly rooted in the boxcar-jumpin’ spirit of the American West, by turns joyous and tragic. However, whilst the connection is obvious, the songs spun by Gibson throughout La Grande’s course are anything but. [read more]

Comments

Follow Us

Recommended Posts

Popular Posts

Mailing List

Sign up to our weekly mailing list.