Listen to 405 Radio
  • No Events

    We'll get something in the diary soon

The Lemonheads - Hotel Sessions

The Lemonheads - Hotel Sessions

by , 03 January 2012

2011 has been a year of highly glossy pop and R&B and a spectacular selection of electronic artists breaking through, with polished and refined music that saunter from cold, icy minimalism to crisp, clean sampling insanity. But how about something completely different to start 2012? Evan Dando, of The Lemonheads, has been putting the finishing touches to an early 90s recordings, aptly titled Hotel Sessions, due to the Australian residence he was staying in after their first Japanese tour had finished.

Consisting of music that made it onto their sixth record, Come On Feel The Lemonheads, and various unfinished demos, the stripped pack, laid bare collection offers a uniquely open artistic release, showcasing the bare bones, talented as they may be, before any studio or technology gets their hands on the darn things. Hailed by Mr Dando himself as the $53 album (due to that being the cost of a walkman and a tape…), the 14 tracks offer a deal more insight, heart and depth than the biggest, loudest pop smashes of the past few years.

‘Paid To Smile’ and ‘’I’ll Do It Anyway’ are wonderfully preserved sonic nuggets, with the hiss and crackle of the tape standing as an audible monument to the pure pop intelligence whirring away within the band during this time period. Similarly, in the amble of ‘Down About You’ and the passing motorbike grunting at the end of ‘Being Around’, an aura of intimacy and a surprisingly personal ambience crackle to life. Everything isn’t up to complete scratch, with a couple of unreleased tracks like ‘Superhero’ rolling towards bland and wishy-washy territory, but these act as temporary blips in the pleasant proceedings

There’s a nostalgic moment on ‘You Can Take It With You (Part 2)’, halfway through the record, where Dando states he is gonna ‘risk one more short one on this side’, recalling a lost point in musical recording history. And the album, generally, delivers that same nostalgic sense, especially with somewhat simple lyrics, tunes and vocals that recall a lost adolescence, highlighting this talented young musician at a point in time where The Lemonheads were in the midst of their most commercial and critically successful period (just before Dando’s drug issues lead to their sad decline). It’s an easy listening sort of brilliance, not quite shimmering with wonder but trundling along with a soft, comforting pace, granting a welcome insight behind the so-called-scenes of such a shining artist.

Rating: 7/10

Purchase and listen

Don't Miss Out

Related Reviews

  • The Kabeedies - Soap

    The Kabeedies - Soap

    by Euan Mackay

    The second album complex, it's a tricky bugger isn't it? So many falter thanks to record company putting pressure to rushing out an incomplete set of tracks that were penned on the tour bus, are tinged by exhausted in-fighting and so just don't quite hang together. Well, having allowed just about three years to elapse since their debut offer, The Kabeedies return with a new label backing (hello, Fierce Panda) and with their new album Soap. [read more]

  • Guided By Voices - Let’s Go Eat The Factory

    Guided By Voices - Let’s Go Eat The Factory

    by Barnabas Abraham

    An album which sounds like various cuttings from a garage floor, held together with staples. Looking at the staples, you see that they’ve been been put in a few times, before they’ve finally stuck. There are holes around the edges where previous staple attempts have failed, but looking at the staples in place now, they look solid, they look good. [read more]

  • Blondes - Blondes

    Blondes - Blondes

    by Gavin Bevan

    Sam Haar and Zach Steinman make up Blondes, a duo with the power to create emotions that you previously didn’t know existed. Their mixture of techno, IDM and intelligent usage of synthesizers, sequencers and drum machines have helped to create an album already earmarked for the dizzy heights of your end of year list. [read more]

  • Death of Death of Discotheque - Count My Face

    Death of Death of Discotheque - Count My Face

    by Daniel Offen

    Yes, this band is called Death of Death of Discotheque. Their clumsy, unwieldy title (which I initially thought was a file naming mistake) is probably the worst thing about the group and should be disregarded. Musically DODOD produce the sort of dance music that both gets feet moving and mental cogs turning. A good reference point are Errors, DODOD never relent, hitting the listener with a wave of powerful synths, offbeat drums, tangy guitars and distorted vocals. [read more]

Comments

Follow Us

Recommended Posts

Popular Posts

Mailing List

Sign up to our weekly mailing list.