LA's famed Hollywood sign has quite the interesting history from its relatively humble beginnings as "Hollywoodland" the housing development in 1923 to today. An interesting history of the sign can be read here, and a few looks at the folklore around it – including reported hauntings, like that of aspiring starlet Peg Entwistle who jumped from the “H” in 1932 – can be read here and here.

"Hollywoodland" circa 1923. Wikimedia Commons.

"Hollywoodland" advertisement. Late 1920s early 1930s.

"Hollywoodland" advertisement. Late 1920s early 1930s. Courtesy LA Daily Mirror.

Peg Entwistle's suicide. September 20, 1932. Courtesy rarenewspapers.com

Warner Bros. is reportedly looking at a $100 million aerial tram from their studio backlot to the Hollywood sign in part because their real estate is closest to it (the journey would be six minutes one way). The studio said in a statement, "Given our close proximity to the north side of the Hollywood sign, we believe we offer a solution that has the least impact on the environment — protecting and preserving Griffith Park and the surrounding residential neighborhoods. We understand there are a number of possible solutions being considered, but we are confident the City's feasibility study will show our proposal to be the best option — an option that can be built and operated at no cost to the taxpayer and that will provide public benefit to the City of Los Angeles and its residents."

The studio elaborated on their reasoning for the tram in their statement, "The sign's fame, however, has created unintended negative effects such as heavy traffic in adjacent residential areas and related safety concerns," the studio said. "The concept of an aerial tram as a solution is one that been suggested in the past and was most recently highlighted as a potential solution in the comprehensive strategies report by Dixon Resources Unlimited."

The project will reportedly not cause LA or California taxpayers anything. The studio is currently embarking on a "listening tour" of LA politicians, civic and environmental groups, and anybody concerned with the project to gather feedback before moving forward.