To celebrate the release of Perfect Pussy's debut album Say Yes To Love, which is out March 18th via Captured Tracks, we asked Meredith Graves to put together a list-based feature for us. It's fantastic and well worth your time.

I am a content hound. I don't participate in much social networking, but I keep my Facebook because I like to see the compendium of articles that people post. I see better writing on more interesting and important topics that way than I would scouring the internet myself. Here is some internet content I've read recently that I think is very important, that you might like, too:

1. FREE CECE Documentary:

Cece McDonald's case received some, but not enough, attention when it first happened in 2011. CeCe, a trans* woman of color, defended herself to survive a racist, transphobic, life-threatening attack and was subsequently jailed for 41 months in a men's prison. Her story is INCREDIBLY IMPORTANT, and the fact that this documentary has only received a minute percentage of its desired funding is sad and scary. This film will draw attention to the disproportionate violence and risk that trans* women (And specifically trans* women of color) experience. Everyone should know about this project if they don't already. Read and donate, please.


2. Library of Congress digital collection of the Carl Sagan Archives:

After reading The Demon Haunted World a few years ago, and watching most of his televised documentary series Cosmos, I developed a certain reverence for Carl Sagan. A friend of mine brought this to my attention a couple of weeks ago and it's a great resource for some of his more rare drafts and documents.


3. Rookie Magazine, Killing Yourself To Live: On The Value of the Teenage Death Wish

I am lucky to know some really incredible writers, and Lola is one of the smartest people I've ever known, ever. She writes for Rookie now, and publishes articles that resonate to the bone with me despite my definitely not being a teenager any more. In this piece, she analyzes with deep compassion the teenage drive for self-abuse, intentional or otherwise. She stresses the importance of forgiveness, most importantly of yourself, but also the world. It is compassionate as fuck; her summation is that teenagers are fighting to live, but they're fighting themselves instead of the systems that are trying to destroy them. This is beautiful.

4. Al Jazeera, Hate Lena Dunham? You'll Love Llewyn Davis


I have read so much about Girls without ever having seen it. I know that people have made some serious critiques of the show as being racist, transphobic, and deeply classist, so when I saw this article pop up on my internets a week or so ago, it definitely made sense to me. I believe that people should be critiqued for making fucked-up, ignorant art, but I also feel like Lena Dunham is receiving a disproportionate amount of hatred for being young and female. Most of the critique I've read was written by white men, and while they'd sometimes touch briefly on racism (consider transphobia ignored entirely, save for pieces I've read written by other trans* people), their primary critiques had to do with her self-centered nature, financial privilege and the fact that apparently, she gets naked a lot. This piece confirms some thoughts I've had since I started reading Girls critique-- that Dunham, despite her intelligence, bravery and willingness to do what she does on tv (and willingness to engage in conversation about the problems people have with her show), is still considered a 'soft target' on the basis of her gender. An interesting read whether you have seen the show or not.


5. Black Girl Dangerous, 4 Ways To Push Back Against Your Privilege

Black Girl Dangerous is an incredible website that is run by and highlights the work of trans* and queer writers of color. This article is an amazing resource that I saw posted by someone who wanted to highlight the idea presented that, "acknowledging that something is messed up doesn’t mean anything if you still participate just because, dang, you really want to and stuff." I think this is something that gets in the way of a lot of people who want to seem savvy to 'social justice'-- especially on the internet, especially as it relates to the hardcore scene. Too many people want to LOOK like they really 'get' their privilege but then continue to participate in things that are completely oppressive. This article is absolutely essential to educating people on how not to be fucked up. Donate to BGD so they can keep doing this work.