The streets of Paris were quiet on Sunday because it was the weekend following Bastille day and the start of the summer, which means a mass exodus of the city as Parisians set off on vacation. In the north of Paris, La Villette park is a popular sun trap for the Parisians who stay put for the summer and on Sunday it was even more lively, loud and colourful than usual. Boldly dressed fashionistas descended on the Grande Halle venue, in the park, as Afropunk came to Paris.

Afropunk Fest has been a key date on the Brooklyn calendar for ten years, so there is excitement about Afropunk coming across to Europe. Paris was its first stop this year (London's next) and everybody was more than ready to celebrate African and Caribbean culture, countercultures and artistic expression, in the same large venue that hosts Pitchfork Paris. Fashion-forward festival goers revelled in a safe space, respecting the festival's right-on rules (some rules are good), which were visible on posters and merchandise; "No Sexism, No Racism, No Ableism, No Ageism, No Homophobia, No Fatphobia. No Transphobia, No Hatefulness".

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The atmosphere was inclusive, cheerful but the vibe also felt a bit wonky and uncertain at times - probably because it is still quite a new festival in Paris and it did feel like the festival was still trying to find its feet. The organisation was very good and the festival staff were friendly but switching between different sides of the stage rather than having two didn't work as you could hear some sound checks as artists played. Teething and technical glitches aside, people seemed to be having a blast; many were peacocking in front of the cameras, meeting up with old and new friends and enjoying a festival that promotes a global, DIY, expressive and conclusive counterculture. There were incredible outfits, stalls selling dazzling prints and food stalls serving up some delicious soul food.

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Laura Mvula got a hero's welcome and gave a confident, funny and heartfelt performance in front of a loving crowd. Earlier on, London duo, Nova Twins, fired onto the stage and captivated with their youthful and aggressive mix of grime-pop, hip-hop and punk. It was brash, loud and all about the bass. The line-up was a showcase of fresh and established talent such as Yasiin Bey (aka Mos Def), Robert Glasper Experiment, Baloji, Disiz La Peste, Tshegue, Fantastic Negrito, Faada Freddy, Petite Noir and Songhoy Blues.

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Blitz the Ambassador knows how to put on a show and, with his band, gave a show with unyielding energy. The enthusiasm was reciprocated as he encouraged crowds to dance, shout and sing along. Blitz aka Samuel Bazawule, is Brooklyn-based and talked about his native Ghana. Hands were high in the air as he spread his global message, which transcends borders, languages and culture. It seems they would have been welcome to play all afternoon as the crowd soaked up a fusion of Afrobeat/'70s funk, jazz and modern hip-hop.

Overall, Afropunk Paris was a real whirlwind of culture, rebellion and expression that is a feast for all the senses and has the potential to be a key-date on the Paris music calendar.

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