Back in October, the three albums Boards of Canada released on Warp Records - Music Has the Right to Children, Geogaddi, The Campfire Headphase - were reissued, complete with brand new pressings and additional content. Not only that, but the three EPs they released on the same label - Twoism, A Beautiful Place Out In the Country, Trans Canada Highway - were released this week.

As well as providing all the important information you lovely people will need about these releases, I'll also be taking you on a short journey through my life with Boards of Canada's Warp releases, as well as convincing you to purchase the records by telling you that it may yet prove to be the best decision you'll make in 2013. If you're still reading this, the likelihood is that you're already a fan of Boards of Canada. Even if you're not, I implore you to carry on.

I don't know about you, but as far as I'm concerned, Boards of Canada are my 2am band - in other words, they're the band I rely on in the early hours of the morning to explain my sudden regret and existentialism when I'm given time to think. Why? Well, the best explanation I can offer for why I allow Boards of Canada to break my mind apart is that their layered, meticulous approach to huge, sweeping pieces of downtempo electronic music always seems to ignite brain activity unlike anything else. Not only are they my 2am band, they're also my reading music and the band I climbed Ben Nevis listening to. They're always there when it's quietest in my head, when I either have to concentrate or when I'm given time to allow my mind to wander. They're brain food to me.



Music Has the Right to Children:

Now, out of all the three albums the Scottish duo has reissued, their debut, Music Has the Right to Children, is perhaps the most significant album to me out of three. A friend of mine once said that "your favourite Boards of Canada album is simply the first one you experience," and to a certain extent I agree with him. Music Has the Right to Children came to me at a time of change in my life - I'd never properly felt electronic music affect me before until I heard that album - and looking back, do I now realise that it was the album itself which caused the change. It's a shame that the reissue of this vinyl *still* doesn't include 'Happy Cycling' in the UK - but luckily we live in an age where we can listen to things on YouTube in a click, so you can get hold of the track for yourself if you're absolutely desperate for the full works.

Release details:

  • Original release date: April 20, 1998
  • Repress date: October 21, 2013
  • Catalogue number: WARPLP55R
  • Mastering: Original Metalwork
  • Discs: 2
  • Vinyl weight: 140g
  • Vinyl colour: Black
  • Sleeve: Gatefold
  • Inner sleeve: White polylined
  • Download Code? Yes
  • Sticker? Yes
  • Music Has the Right to Children also includes a Skam braille sticker, but does not include 'Happy Cycling' which appears on the currently available CD.


Geogaddi:

Next up for Boards of Canada was Geogaddi which, instead of the bleak desolation that filled out their debut, was shrouded in devilish warmth as different environments were explored in its textural probing. Whether it's the ominous, sinister beauty of 'Julie and Candy' or the pulsating, developing '1969', Geogaddi spends its 66 minutes and 6 seconds constantly creeping up on you, until the completely silent 'Magic Window' brings proceedings to a close, perhaps resembling the moment that the album finally reaches you. This is where my friend's earlier statement gains more importance and relevance for me: I see Geogaddi as the more explorative, researched, detailed, diverse record of the band's two key releases, but the sentimentality that attaches itself between myself and Boards of Canada's debut drags the two us together to form a bond that Geogaddi could never break.

Release details:

  • Original release date: February 18, 2002
  • Repress date: October 21, 2013
  • Catalogue number: WARPLP101R
  • Mastering: Recut by Noel Summerville from original DAT Master
  • Discs: Three
  • Vinyl weight: 140g
  • Vinyl colour: Black
  • Sleeve: 6 panel
  • Inner sleeve: Printed
  • Download code? Yes
  • Sticker? Yes
  • Geogaddi also includes etching on side f. six panel gatefold sleeve, this differs from the album's original sleeve.


The Campfire Headphase:

For some, The Campfire Headphase was a slight disappointment. Personally, I don't see where any hefty amount of criticism begins. Another change of mood saw Boards of Canada create their first album that belonged well within the bounds of a sunny day by the ocean. With the inclusion of guitars and slightly more straightforward percussion, there was a never previously explored human element to the album, but the likes of 'Peacock Tail' and album standout 'Dayvan Cowboy' were evidence enough that Boards of Canada were still capable of producing masterpieces. On a personal level, album closer 'Farewell Fire' will have the memories of the most bleak and directionless weeks of my life forever encased in its improvised, patient melodies. It's still painful to listen to if I pick the right moment - perhaps at 2am.

Release details:

  • Original release date: 10/17/2005
  • Repress date 10/21/2013
  • Catalogue number: warplp123r
  • Mastering: Original Metalwork
  • Discs: Two
  • Vinyl weight: 140g
  • Vinyl colour: Black
  • Sleeve: Gatefold
  • Inner sleeve: Printed
  • Download code? Yes
  • Sticker? Yes

Twoism / A Beautiful Place Out In the Country / Trans Canada Highway:

It's often Boards of Canada's incidental pieces that break their albums up so delicately, so it would be no surprise to hear the their EPs break up their entire discography in the same way. Twoism paved the way from the very beginning with snippets of tracks that would later be found buried in parts of their future discography, A Beautiful Place Out In the Country hinted at the eventual transition between Music Has the Right to Children and Geogaddi, whilst the inclusion of 'Dayvan Cowboy' on Trans Canada Highway gave Boards of Canada their perfect send off, until their eventual return earlier this year.

More release information can be found here.

As for this piece, I'm hopeful that I've convinced you to part with your hard earned cash for more Boards of Canada. But as well as that, if you do purchase any of these vinyls, could you promise me one thing? That one night, when you're sat up at 2am and your thoughts are wandering aimlessly down nostalgic pathways, you'll put on one of these recordsand just sit there, allowing your thoughts to become more dangerous and filled with regret. It might just destroy you, but I reckon Boards of Canada are allowed to do that. Here's 'Farewell Fire', let it play out: