'No More Art' plastered across a sizeable vase immediately confronts the viewer when coming up the stairs to approach the current Grayson Perry exhibition at Manchester Gallery. Challenging declarations such as this resonate across Perry's oeuvre and set the tone for the rest of the display. It is rare to come across the opinion that there is too much art in the world, particularly in an established art institution like the Manchester Gallery. Perry is known for drawing on very contemporary and often difficult issues, whilst remaining true to the traditional techniques of ceramics and textiles. Rather than considering them crafts, Perry shows up that these are valid forms for fine art to take.

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Perry's stance against elitism is manifest in both his subject matter and choice of media; in this display the gallery itself has mirrored this subversion. The gallery's Creative Consultants, a group of 15 to 18 year-olds, worked on the display. Their fresh ideas brought about an interesting juxtaposition of objects from the gallery's collection relating to themes found in Perry's work. You may expect to stumble across 'Celebs', 'Beauties', 'Boozers' and 'Heroes' in Perry's work, but interesting connections are drawn between these and more traditional items such as Victorian pottery.

Parallels with the gallery's permanent collection are interesting, as the works are to reside amongst them; the exhibition is to commemorate the acquisition of two new works: 'Jane Austen in E17' and 'Print for a Politician'. A series of two vases: 'Entrance to the Forest' is also displayed. All vases are dominating in size and style, as Perry is not one to shy away from his commentary. 'Jane Austen in E17' displays drawings of Victorian women against found images portraying contemporary London society. The artist explains that juxtaposition allows us to draw parallels between the two situations and to see how far we have come. Although- as a Grayson Perry work- undoubtedly the current condition does not come off well, ultimately suggesting we have not come very far. 'Entrance to the Forest' also portrays a destructive contemporary scene in an equally subtle manner. Scenes are displayed across the vases in a traditional manner but closer inspection reveals distinct conflicts; what could be gusts of wind are in fact gold condoms, littering the scene. As in much of his work, Perry's alter ego, Claire dominates this imagery. Whereas the artist could once shock for publicly cross-dressing, causing a stir accepting his Turner Prize as Claire in 2003, now she is as integral to Perry's work and public face as his own. He seems to use her to critique his own identity and insecurities alongside those of the contemporary society that he judges so recurrently.

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Grayson Perry: Visual Dialogues is currently showing at Manchester Art Gallery until February 2012, after which these works will be integrated into the permanent collection: a valuable addition to the collection.