We’ve written about 22-year-old Henry Green before and, chance are, we’ll write about Henry Green again. His particular slant on moody electronica mixes between easily-accessible ear grabbers and a certain chilling, atmospheric twist that engulfs the sound with a cinematic feel.

For his debut album, Shift, he has chosen the theme of movement as the guiding idea running through all of the songs. Indeed, the opening line of the title track finds him singing “I feel movement…” and this movement for Green is both physical and emotional and all about progression and change.

Drawing inspiration from Jai Paul, Jon Hopkins, Olafur Arnalds and Nils Frahm, Green worked on the record with German producer, Nico Rebscher (he has collaborated with Aurora quite a bit) and the result is a magnificent ten-track set, which beautifully soundtracks winter’s movement into spring.

As he prepares to launch Shift, Henry Green takes The 405’s Things You Should Know About My Debut Album challenge.

If I had to summarise Shift in one sentence, it would be…

A collection of sounds fluctuating in dynamics and pace, to create a feeling of constant movement.

I chose the title Shift because…

Lyrically it made a lot of sense but it was also a word I kept mentioning in production... either to describe a track's progression or the pace and feel of the album. I just really wanted to make an album that felt like it was constantly changing, tugging and releasing and moving at a variety of paces.

The first production idea for the album came with…

The vocal sample in the chorus of 'Another Light'. But the first fully formed songs were probably 'Aiir', 'Something' and 'Stay Here'. All three were written acoustically, whilst building up the production and arrangement separately. I tend to pair the written elements with the electronics quite late on in the process, so the songs' intimacy and honesty hopefully remain intact and don't get suffocated by the production.

My working routine on this album involved…

A lot of piecing together of fragments of sound or words that felt special to me and arranging them in ways that would still intrigue me, even after the 100th listen. I'd leave a lot of sketches alone for weeks and then return to them in a different head space and approach them from a different angle. It'd sometimes almost feel like I was collaborating with myself, bouncing off the ideas I'd had weeks before. I think that helped me to see the songs in alternate ways because I'd never be feeling the exact same way or being inspired by the exact same things when I was working on them.

My favourite part of the recording process was…

Collaborating with others. It was really refreshing to apply that process that I was going through, but with completely fresh ears and new ideas. Taking the shells of a few of my songs out to Berlin and working on them with Nico Rebscher was really eye-opening. We played with so many amazing synths, Nico put down some beautiful sax and flute and we just soaked up an atmosphere and let it out in the arrangements. I loved working with my best friend, Jack Shuter, on a few of the other tracks too. I worked on the last EP with him and knew that we'd work together on this album. He's a talented chap.

The song that has evolved the most between its initial version and the finished album version is…

'Without You'. It actually started out as this fairly cluttered, instrumental dance track. I stripped away the elements, looped the harp samples and wrote the chord progression and melodies on top. I spent a lot of time working on making it feel really intimate and personal and then eventually layered up the arrangement and counteracted that intimacy with quite expansive, open production.

The song that took the longest to nail down was…

A track called 'In Bloom' that I actually decided to pull from the album a few days before its deadline. Jack and I spent so much time rearranging it, mixing it, trying to make it feel cohesive with the album. It never really felt like it was supposed to sit alongside the other songs. I made the instrumental 'Diversion' with Jack as an escape from the album production when we were out in Berlin and had a late night epiphany that it was meant to be on the album all along.

I knew Shift was finished when…

'Diversion' got on the album. I'll always have difficulty letting go of the tracks and understanding when they're actually done, but finishing 'Diversion' certainly provided closure and a realisation that the album was everything it could be.

The song I am most attached to on the album is…

'Stay Here'. It was written at a time of struggle, but it helped to bring down some barriers and inspire me to write again. I didn't think that I'd tackle that feeling of isolation so honestly in a track and also reflect it through the sparseness of the production. But the song progresses and lifts exactly how I wanted it to and feels really satisfying to hear now.

From all of the tracks, the one I am most excited about performing live is…

‘Another Light’. A part of me really wanted to create this really hypnotic extended outro for 'Another Light', but I eventually decided against having that on the recorded version. I think it'll make a lot more sense in a live setting, so I'm really looking forward to playing that with the band. We circle on the song's groove for an extra couple of minutes and pull out some super strong dance moves.

The lyric I am most proud of on the album is…

On the verses of 'Another Light'. I knew that some elements had a slightly 'poppy' feel to them so I wanted to make sure it still felt like me in the lyrics. Maybe this second verse lyric is my favourite: 'The sleet trickled from my skin to ground Because I couldn't be any more dissolved than you have me'. But I weirdly feel quite proud of all the lyrics on the album. I think I said everything I wanted to say, in the way I wanted to say it.

Shift is out on 30 March on AKIRA Records.