I would by no means consider myself to be an experimental music connoisseur; however I am partial to the occasional spot of Kraftwerk, John Cage, Terry Riley and La Monte Young. (I imagine you feel complete now you know that!) Jackie-O-Motherfucker is, however, one of the big experimental troupes that I haven't come across whilst travelling along my Experimental yellow brick road, so hearing their latest releaseFig.5 & Liberation has been a nice discovery for me.

Jackie-O-Motherfucker (or "JOMF") has been going for over 15 years (formed in 1994) which is pretty impressive. They've also had more members than Gun N Roses which, in itself, is a pretty monumental achievement. I must also say, that I love that they initially only released vinyl's. There's something very romantic about a vinyl, so they added to the "charm" of their music by distributing it in this manner.

Enough rambling anyway, Fig.5 & Liberation perfectly highlights the reason why so many people out there "hate to love" Experimental music. Jackie-O-Motherfucker's music is so progressive, abstract and discordant that you find yourself willing for some melody or tune to suddenly explode into the mix (maybe I'm just too much of a traditionalist though). A perfect example of this repetitive noise can be found in 'Analogue Skillet'. I am exceedingly fond of this track (probably my favourite of the dual Album). The deep and ever-so-slightly resonating drum, (sounds like either a low tom-tom or possibly a Timpani) whirring analogue noises (which may be found in a Mario game on your old Game Boy Colour) combined with the feedback and flickering electric current noises, create this wonderfully vivid image in my mind of an overloading power conduit in the middle of a barren landscape.

Another track I particularly enjoy listening to is 'Amazing Grace'. It encompasses all of the instrumentation that one would expect to hear when travelling to the deep south of North America. To try and convey to you how fabulous and quirky this rendition of 'Amazing Grace' is, I genuinely wish that it were the American National Anthem. Even I, a typical Brit, would be proud to pick up a banjo and attempt to play along with this, if it were to be blasted out of the speakers at the Super Bowl.

Both of the tracks mentioned are from Fig.5, however, Liberation also contains some thoroughly interesting and unique pieces of music. As an album, Liberation strikes me as being the more "laid back" of the two (ironic how as soon as I typed that, the woman's scream blared out - 'In Between' (03:49)). Clean and acoustic guitars - along with a glockenspiel (don't quote me on that) - seem to be used far more frequently to add a vague sense of melody to the mix. There also appears to be a far greater sense of harmony in this album.

All in all, Jackie-O-Motherfucker, I salute you. Fig.5 & Liberation are two very interesting and very different albums. While they may not appeal to everybody, I believe that there is at least one track on each album that will tickle your fancy. Jackie-O-Motherfucker have managed to accomplish the difficult task of making Experimental music that you can actually put on your iPod and listen to on the train; rather than sitting in a cupboard under the stairs when nobody's around, swaying from side-to-side, imagining that you're flying on a magic carpet (bit extreme maybe!).

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