Eerie-electro twosome, Kaleida, release their first album, Tear The Roots, today following on from recent singles, the dazzling 'Meter', their cover of Nena's German anti-war protest song, '99 Luftballons' and the terrific 'Echo Saw You'. The Anglo-German duo (Cicely and Christina, as they are known to the parents) write, record and produce everything themselves and their output to date has racked up over 34 million streams worldwide, which is pretty impressive for an emerging act.

With Kaleida's debut being one of our favourite releases this autumn, we present you with a listening guide to it, in which Cicely and Christina share their thoughts on some of its tracks and their working process.

If we had to summarise Tear The Roots in one sentence, it would be…

A journey into the dark feminine.

We chose to name the record after its closing track because…

We thought the idea of 'tearing the roots' was about searching for something in a kind of manic way and leaving the past behind. Our album came out of the mess we were groping through at the time. Before making the record, we felt that we were being pushed in many different ways but what came out was the product of our struggle to stay authentic to our sound.

The first song we wrote for Tear The Roots was…

'Think', which was the first song we ever wrote together. It just won't die for some reason! Anyway, it fitted with the album and still had a place there - it sort of marks where we've come from and where we've got to.

Our working routine on this album involved…

Getting up, eating a lot of sardines, recording, having an existential crisis, eating more sardines, recording more, deleting half of it, discussing, starting again the next day and the next day again.

The best part of the recording process was when…

We started to realise that a new sound was emerging and things seemed to just take on a life of their own - everything feeds off each other and that's why making a whole body of work is still so important. Actually, recording can be really time-consuming and monotonous, going over take after take. We once did a whole day of recording only to realise that all the takes had Cicely's daughter babbling in the background. Our studio isn't very pro.

'Echo Saw You' ended up as the album's calling card because…

It felt like a link from our old sound into the new direction of the album. The track is also about having the courage to carry on - it represented a chink of hope to us, in what was - at points - a difficult time.

The song that has evolved the most between its initial version and the finished album version is…

'Convolution'. We wrote a version of this track ages ago and it was kind of cheesy so it got left in the parking lot but when we started trying to produce 'Meter' we needed a distraction as we kind of felt a lot of pressure to get it right for various reasons. Anyway, it meant we just got to let loose on that one - it's a track of emancipation.

The song that took the longest to nail down was…

'Echo Saw You'. It had a personality meltdown a while back, as did we as a band. It obviously sounds like a cliché but when you're starting out you have to find your identity. These songs have come to mark the journey we've been on to stay confident about what we are doing.

We knew Tear The Roots was finished when…

It just suddenly coalesced into one body when we took a step back and listened to it all together. It happened quite quickly and out of an intense period of writing last year.

From all of the tracks, the one we are most excited about performing live in our London show this October is…

'Convolution'. It gets pretty intense. There'll be some surprises, even we don't really know what's going on.

The lyric we are most proud of on the album is…

"Out in the plastic sea, we drown the innocent", which is taken from our track 'House of Pulp'. We feel really strongly about communicating what's going on with the environment at the moment – it's the issue of our age and there's not enough dialogue about it. Christina works as an environmental consultant in her day job and the track was inspired by some really unsustainably built houses around where she grew up in Florida.

Tear The Roots is out now on Lex Records.