Bomba Estéreo are not new to the scene, Simón Mejía and Li Saumet have been making music for more than a decade and with every record they’ve put out, they’ve honoured their roots and continued being themselves.

Back in August, they released their 5th album, Ayo, which was partly recorded in the Sierra Nevada of Santa Marta, located in Colombia, where the band is from. There, some pre-colonial indigenous communities that have survived for centuries still live. This, their culture, and a lot of Colombian humour blends into their music, as well as popular sayings and ways of speaking.

Bomba Estéreo

If you’re not familiar with Latin rhythms, it could be hard to pinpoint exactly everything that their sound involves, although it’s quite easy to explain. “Our music is electronic music made in Latin America”, says Simón, “what I love about electronic music is that the person who knows what it is, knows it is an infinite universe. Just like ours, an infinite universe to set up encounters between our dancing tropical music and electronic beats and synthesizers." They build bridges between those two universes that are so similar, as they were made to be danced to, tropical and dance music.

Some of their musical influences come from Colombian cumbia, salsa and champeta, like Joe Arroyo, El Sayayin, Petrona Martínez and Totó La Momposina, a cumbia giantess who still makes music today. Bomba Estéreo feels proud of where they are without changing who they are, “to be born in Latin America and in a country like Mexico or Colombia is pretty hard; opportunities are scarce and that’s why people migrate to the ‘first’ world." Instead of migrating, they decided to stay and search their roots to find their own sound, “those roots took us to what Bomba is today." Simón fondly believes in Tolstoy’s saying: “Describe your village and you’ll describe the world".

Bomba Estéreo

In a continent where English has predominated and has been a cultural leader for ages, language has ceased to be a barrier to connect with crowds from other countries; Li sings in Spanish, sometimes there’s a bit of Spanglish here and there, yet people still relate and react to their electricity.

“Music will always be a very powerful means of expression that will create infinite effects on people, one of them is resisting to be a part of what others impose on us or a certain type of thinking. It’s a way of connecting with things that go beyond the real world." Simón thinks that music today must be a vehicle to create hope and resistance, it has a unifying power when walls want to be built around us.

Bomba Estéreo

The power of their Latin music is permeating all over the world, they are a band with its own essence and a well-marked path. Bomba Estéreo resists through their lyrics and by sharing through each song a bit of what they are made of.

Get to know a bit more about what’s happening down in Colombia by listening to bands like Systema Solar, Mitu, Sidestepper, Ácido Pantera and Ghetto Kumbé, they’ll surely make you dance.

Bomba Estéreo
Bomba Estéreo
Bomba Estéreo
Bomba Estéreo
Bomba Estéreo
Bomba Estéreo
Bomba Estéreo