Major Murphy

We recorded 95% of the album onto 2” tape. The most efficient way to record to tape is live, so we did most of the record live as well. We also didn’t use a click in an effort to create an organic feel. Because we didn’t want to pay for more than a couple rolls of tape, we recorded over each take till we settled on one. It was the first time recording like that for myself, Jacki, and Bud. A little nerve-wracking but also inspiring - Credit: Anna Powell Teeter

Major Murphy

Most of the band was oriented in a large live room, with our amps positioned in a way to limit bleed. The bass amp was isolated in an adjacent room. The drums where also in a dead isolation room, but the door had a window so we could see Bud. Credit: Anna Powell Teeter

Major Murphy

Half of the drums on the record were recorded in the dead room and half were recorded in the large live room. The tracks with drums in the live room where tracks that only Jacki, Bud, and myself recorded on. I was set up in the dead room on acoustic guitar and vocal and Bud and Jacki were in the big room. Credit: Anna Powell Teeter

Major Murphy

Ben Lumsdaine recorded a lot of the lead guitar on the album. He put together a solo for the outro of Mary. It took him a few takes but every take was beautiful. We would have been happy with the first take, but he kept dialling in on something, and we all agree, found something pretty special. He also added the organ part to 'Mary' which ended up becoming the only sound other than the voice in the intro. Credit: Anna Powell Teeter

Major Murphy

Aaron Denton played keys and guitar. He brought with him three keyboards and used each one at some point. On the song, One Day he lent Jacki his polyphonic Korg keyboard and she came up with a brassy synth pad. Meanwhile, on that tune, he tracked a funky Wurlitzer part. Credit: Jacob Bullard

Major Murphy

The record was recorded in June over the course of 10 days. Unfortunately, we felt that one of the songs ('When I Go Out') didn’t translate in the studio during this session and returned in August to try it again. It is the August session you hear on the record. Credit: Jacob Bullard

Major Murphy

All the songs were mixed by Mike Bridavsky over four days at the end of the ten-day session. I hung around for this time, lounging on the control room couch occasionally giving opinions and impressions of mixes. I was exhausted from having performed the songs, but I think Mike was even more exhausted from engineering. It was a little delirious. Credit: Anna Powell Teeter

Major Murphy

A lot of the production sounds and techniques were inspired by sounds of the 1970s. John Lennon, Patti Smith, Television, and like artists served as a sonic jumping off point for the production sensibility of the album. Many times if I was sceptical of something Mike was doing he would assure me it was “very '70s” and quickly settle the issue. Credit: Anna Powell Teeter

Major Murphy

A few of the songs have double-tracked vocals which is an old technique but is super fun to do and easy way to get a little extra vibe in a recording without going crazy with effects. On the track, Mary, Jacki’s voice was double tracked and my vocal was run through a tremolo effect. Credit: Anna Powell Teeter

Major Murphy

The title track, 'No. 1', was recorded on the second take and most overdubs on that song where the first take. Recording that song was a very special anomaly in the studio where the experience was mutually exciting and immediate for us all. A lot of times you will get bogged down in several takes of something but that one flowed. Getting it down so quickly felt great and fitting given its title.

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Major Murphy's debut album, No.1, is due out on March 30th via Winspear. Listen to 'One Day' below.