We recently took a trip to the North; Liverpool to be precise.

We were invited by Red Bull to come check out their Red Bull Music Academy showcase of Digital Soul featuring a carefully curated trio of artists; artists that truly emulate the sound and have connections to the city. The venue hosting this show was also something to get excited about. Sefton Parks Palm House is a Victorian-era glasshouse teaming with tropical fauna. This unique venue was fitted out for this one-off show, complementing the theme of the night.

Liverpool Uni student SG Lewis has deep ties within the city, so it was quite apt that he would front a showcase of digital soul with his melodic, club-friendly electronica. SG Lewis could be credited for pioneering this sound during 2016 with his Yours EP released earlier this year, but SG cites an artist who can be credited as the founder of this new electronic music movement: the original Digital Soul boy, Jamie Woon. With his latest release Making Time recently nominated for a Mercury Music prize, he was personally invited by SG to headline the evening with support from local producer Suedebrown.

It was difficult to not be inspired by the surrounding atmosphere; SG's uplifting lyrics with vibrant synths provided the aural pleasure whilst the incredible scent from the tropical plants enveloped the venue and provided a unique visual experience.

We managed to catch a few moments with Jamie Woon and SuedeBrown to talk about influences, Liverpool, and music.

Redbull Music acadamy Liverpool

This RBMA show has been curated to recognise the rise of Digital Soul and SG Lewis. SG Lewis has cited you as a personal influence in his music. How does it feel to be invited to play here tonight alongside him?

Jamie Woon: It's wicked, he's so talented. A really talented guy, he's only 22 or something! I'm not sure exactly but very young and annoyingly talented. But yeah, his music is really soulful, really cool. I've known about him through being on PMR. He's always been really nice about my music. He was saying today that he's really nervous to play alongside me today and I was like mate, you have absolutely no reason for that! Feels good to be here, it's a cool event and I feel our music will go quite well together.

You've been touring Making Time over the last 12 months. Have you had much time to work on new material since it was released? How do you fit touring and writing into your schedule?

JW: Well that's the million dollar question really. I haven't really totally nailed that one in terms of getting it into perpetual motion. I'm always trying stuff. I did loads of touring this year and just tried. I think it makes you really value your time when you're back at home and makes you really want to get into the studio, I've had a studio all year but obviously I haven't been able to get in there when I've been on the road.

Whenever I'm not I'm there, just trying stuff out you know? Making connections and seeing where the thread of new stuff comes from, I just look for that thing to run towards that's going to be a beacon for new material. I've recorded loads of band sessions and band recordings and jam sessions, I have my own studio set up so I can just walk in there and everyone can sit down. We press record and just play, I have hours and hours of stuff to work with. I feel like I've done a lot of preparatory work for a new record and I'm getting my head into a more writing space now.

Going back to influences, can you tell us who's influencing you at the moment? Places, spaces, music, where do you draw your influences and how do they shape your tracks?

JW: Oh man, anywhere really. I love this author called Russel Hoburn - every single one of his books has a different style. But all of his books try to get to the heart of conciseness, I just love his writing style. How radically differing his writing can be, he's like the Bowie of writing for me! He's not around anymore but yeah, I love his stuff! Musically, I love a lot of the stuff coming out of LA. The soulful stuff, Kendrick and his people. Thundercat and Terrance Martin.

What's left in store for you going forward into the new year?

JW: So I've been dipping my toe into a bit of co-writing and writing for other people, a bit more of the production stuff. It's always something I've been interested in, so hopefully I can get some cuts out. Nothing I can really name yet but I've done quite a bit of that recently! I've always been working on my own stuff so hopefully get some tunes out soon in and around playing some festivals.

Suedebrown

You're a Merseyside local, can you tell us what the music scene is like in Liverpool?

Suedebrown: It's very mixed, predominantly it's looking towards indie and house to be honest. That said, the genres I experiment with seems to be growing. There also some good promotors in town now so it's definitely growing.

How does it feel to be here playing alongside SG Lewis who also has strong connections to the city?

SB: It's amazing! When I got told I was on the list I was already listening to him anyway before this, and obviously Jamie Woon goes without saying. Redbull have always been really good at curating their shows and getting the right artists together.

SG Lewis cites Jamie Woon as an influence to his sound, but where do you draw your influences from when working on your own music?

SB: It depends on where I am and what I'm trying to make. R&B and hip-hop - that's where I started out and they're the main genres that I listen to anyway. I get my main influence from there but with the growing electronic music scene, there are so many good producers that have come out of nowhere at the moment. The likes of Hudson Mohawke from Glasgow, Kaytranada; there is a million and one to turn to at the moment.

Theres definitely a lot of talent coming from the North at the moment. In the South you have the big names that have been around for a few years just doing the rounds. Here there seems to be far more experimentation and new sounds...

SB: Yeah, it feels like there is definitely a bigger window to get your stuff out there than before. I think now in general the UK music scene has a lot more confidence and so now people think about what it means what how they represent their cities. Also thinking about how do we get that across in a really sick way, whereas in the past we copied London or we copied the states and it didn't really take off.

What's left for you going into next year?

SB: This week has been a big week for me in terms of performance. I'm back to production now though. Trying to work towards a follow up to 'Tonight', the first track I put out this summer. Hoping to get that out in the next week/ten days. After that I'll be locking myself away to get the EP done. I'm trying to get that out for January.

Redbull Music acadamy Liverpool
Redbull Music acadamy Liverpool
Redbull Music acadamy Liverpool
Redbull Music acadamy Liverpool
Redbull Music acadamy Liverpool
Redbull Music acadamy Liverpool
Redbull Music acadamy Liverpool
Redbull Music acadamy Liverpool
Redbull Music acadamy Liverpool
Redbull Music acadamy Liverpool
Redbull Music acadamy Liverpool
Redbull Music acadamy Liverpool
Redbull Music acadamy Liverpool
Redbull Music acadamy Liverpool
Redbull Music acadamy Liverpool
Redbull Music acadamy Liverpool
Redbull Music acadamy Liverpool
Redbull Music acadamy Liverpool
Redbull Music acadamy Liverpool
Redbull Music acadamy Liverpool
Redbull Music acadamy Liverpool
Redbull Music acadamy Liverpool
Redbull Music acadamy Liverpool
Redbull Music acadamy Liverpool
Redbull Music acadamy Liverpool
Redbull Music acadamy Liverpool
Redbull Music acadamy Liverpool
Redbull Music acadamy Liverpool
Redbull Music acadamy Liverpool
Redbull Music acadamy Liverpool
Redbull Music acadamy Liverpool
Redbull Music acadamy Liverpool
Redbull Music acadamy Liverpool
Redbull Music acadamy Liverpool
Redbull Music acadamy Liverpool
Redbull Music acadamy Liverpool
Redbull Music acadamy Liverpool
Redbull Music acadamy Liverpool
Redbull Music acadamy Liverpool
Redbull Music acadamy Liverpool