Occasionally, something comes along that challenges a listener or viewer’s power of rational thought. For a reviewer, this is somewhat of an issue. For example, when some young critic first sat down in front of Kubrick’s ‘2001: A Space Odyssey’, spellbound into slack jawed befuddlement and wonder, how could any combination of words thereafter form a comprehensive review of such a spectacle? Within music, artists like Flaming Lip and Syd Barrett must elicit similar responses within the frazzled mind of the recipients of such otherworldly creativity. Zoom to 2012 and Super Best Friends Club are releasing an EP featuring an eight-minute storm of a song titled ‘Sunshine Super Megatron!’ There’s not much else I can say but I’ll try.

Super Best Friends Club are a multitude of individuals whose live shows have developed somewhat of a feverish following, with the band utilising body paint, nudity and frantic, intense dancing. This energy spills over into their recorded work, with an Eastern hum of universal vibration eking the EP into life, as rapid drums and horns begin the dizzy spiral that introduces the true sound of the band on opener ‘Evolution’. Noodling and cascading through a swiftly increasing force of psychedelic sound, SBFC are living up to their manifesto of transforming ‘this cutthroat universe to a loving frequency’. Sonically and atmospherically, it can be likened to The Polyphonic Spree for the sheer joy and Of Montreal for the sheer pop insanity. Things don’t really start until ‘Sunshine, Super Megatron!’ however.

An eight minute ode to a seemingly drug induced vision of a better world, with lyrics proclaiming boldly and proudly, "Hello sunshine, my skin exists only for you." Uplifting and heart-warmingly passionate, the unbridled enthusiasm is a call to arms for the melodies of the heart and the smiles of the soul, only cooling down for the titular ‘People, We Forget This Is Love’. The tenderness trundles across via waves of parping horns and choral voices but the lunacy of the band feels somewhat misplaced or disoriented on record. Perhaps a live show better illustrates the utter ecstasy that appears to be at the heart of the band. Nonetheless, it’s a grinning, grimacing, magnificently terrifying release that shines its own beaming manifesto towards the future. But if this is the future of music, I’m gonna need more body paint…