There's an immediacy and deliberateness to Omni's music. In just a little over a year since their debut, Deluxe, the Atlanta trio delights with the follow-up, Multi-task, continuing to refine and cement their characteristic sound. In less than a month after returning from the UK in late September, the post-punk band packed the tour van to promote the new LP in their native continent. Unfortunately, due to a family emergency, Omni had to turn the wheels towards back to Georgia. But before the unanticipated news forced them to cancel about half of the scheduled tour dates, we had the chance to hang out with Frankie Broyles, Philip Frobos, and Doug Bleichner in Portland, Oregon.

In the morning after Omni's show at the High Water Mark Lounge, we encircled a large wooden table in an idyllic backyard of an Airbnb house for a chat. With the scintillating sun illuminating the colourful fall foliage and chirping birds perched near, our topics ranged from the importance of production, touring overseas, the state of music journalism, and more.

What is the essential Omni sound?

Frankie Broyles: The composition is always really minimal; I think it's how everything interacts that really creates our sound, I would say. Yeah, just guitar-based, drums and vocals I guess. I don't know; that's a bad answer.

Philip Frobos: Tight rhythms, Frankie's guitar leads are unmistakable, and then I'm singing so.

Doug Bleichner: As a person who's not involved in the writing process, as an outside perspective, I think the unmistakable tone - the guitar tone, like the way the guitar is recorded. A lot of that is Nathaniel producing it. But Frankie's tone - I think that sticks out. But the overall production, there's something unique about the way they produced their record. Nathaniel (Higgins) puts a flavor on it that's unmistakably Omni.

So you're saying production is crucial.

DG: Yeah, for this band, as a listener.

Why Nathaniel?

FB: Ah, he's our very good friend. He's like a recording enthusiast. When I try to record stuff on my own, I get burnt out on all the technical details of setting things up, placing mics and all that stuff, and he loves that stuff. And he's really good at it. He's always trying to progress his knowledge of recording techniques. He also pushes us to get everything done.

PF: The other great thing about Nathaniel is that collectively we've known him for over ten years. I mean I've known him even longer than that. He has no agenda or nothing to gain from working with us. Whereas, someone on the outside may have. He just knows us and knows our intentions are. So he knows how to get the best out of us.

FB: Yeah, he's really like another member of the band.

PF: And he has a fantastic knowledge of music history. There's no trend that's getting in the way of how our record is going to sound. It's just sounding the way it supposed to sound.

Damn, you guys are lucky then! From the time you come up with the songs and by the time Nathaniel puts his finishing touches, how much transformation would you say takes place?

FB: I think a lot of it we try to keep it close to the demos. And just kind of refine everything - we worked a lot with tones, mixing, spent a long time changing tiny things that nobody would ever notice I don't think. I don't think there's a huge difference in between like a lot of what happens in the demos and the recording. We try to stay pretty true to it.

PF: There's a lot of great raw energy in the demos, so we try to capture that because a lot of the songs are impulsively AND thoughtfully written.

It seems like you guys have been touring a quite a bit. How is the reception different between North America vs. UK and Europe?

FB: We've done two European/UK tours, and we didn't know what to expect. We were really surprised by the reception. We play bigger shows there than we do over here in the US, which was not something we anticipated.

DG: The first time we went over there, UK was insane. Almost every show was sold out. And then we went back, and it was the same way in the UK but then France - we were blown away by France this time! France came out - it was sick! The crowds are different over there. I feel like when you play small-medium sized towns in Europe, all the townsfolk come, there'll be children, older people, people will come with their parents.

What do you think of the current state of music and music journalism?

DG: I'm not a big fan, to be honest.

FB: It's strange - now people are reviewing our record more and that's really weird to read about - sometimes, somebody would be like, "Ah, this is obviously referencing this." And I was like: I have never in my life listened to a record by that band. You know, something like that.

PF: Yeah, it's funny that people think that we're influenced by the current music.

Current music? Did they name any bands?

FB: you can imagine.

DG: The idea that all the current bands that are the same status as us, we're all listening to each other and feeding off each other. That idea is not true. I feel like music journalist a lot of times are not musicians. And therein lies the problem. Just like movie critics aren't directors. And people play favourites; it's political in the music industry, just like any other industry. But I think it's cool, this record has gotten favourable reviews.

FB: It's just kinda weird to think that somebody is out there and writing stuff about it, like what they think about it. And they're going to put it online, whether it's good or bad.

Do you actually read the reviews?

FB: Yeah, I read some of em; I don't read everything.

When I was younger, when you didn't have all this music on the Internet, I would read the reviews in the magazines to help me to find the music that I may like. But this day and age, when you can just go to Spotify and listen to it, I'm like: why the fuck do I want to waste my time reading a review?

FB: People listen to the music, look up reviews, and then they read how they're supposed to feel about it.

Really?

DG: yeah, that's the whole point of Pitchfork right? Like the whole rating system. We're gonna tell you what's good. Oh, it got this low rating, I'm not even going to hear it. Just use your ear hole to hear the sound and if you like the sound, then it's good to you... why do I care what Pitchfork thinks?

Actually, I did read that Pitchfork review but it didn't influence how I felt about your music. What has been the most difficult challenge in giving birth to Multi-task?

FB: probably recording it while touring at the same time. Yeah, we go on tour and then we come home, then we'd have to start recording in the next day or two. And we work upon until the time we have to leave again. And then get texts from Nathaniel, "We're running out of time!" and it's like: OK, I guess we'll try to finish it.

PF: Yeah, pushing through those deadlines.

How is the music scene in Atlanta? Are there other bands you guys have comradeship with?

FB: Not really, we're not there very often. I don't really go to shows much because we're always at our own shows all the time.

What are some of your favourite places in Atlanta that you'd recommend to visitors?

DG: Stone Mountain, I really like Stone Mountain.

FB: yeah, I climbed the Stone Mountain actually like a month ago. And I went up the scenic ways - there's nobody out there. It's amazing.

PF: Arabia Mountain is really nice too. Kinda, similar thing.

DG: I guess in terms of bars, 529.

PF: Decatur Package has the finest selection of vermouth and great prices too. If you're industry, you get 10% off.

Any cool dive bars?

PF: Yeah, Elmyr is a great one.

FB: The Earl, where we play most of the time

PF: The Righteous Room is a good one.

Multi-task is out now via Trouble In Mind.

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