Joyride. For those nervy enough to dare, it's a moment of liberation sanctioned by an act of rebellion. A time where anarchic freedom outweighs any consequence. That moment when it feels good to be bad.

The jovial verb started as more of a subtle metaphor for 23-year-old R&B songstress Tinashe, who decided to title her long-awaited forthcoming sophomore album Joyride to represent the brave new direction she was taking her music; A calculated revolt against the music industry's expectation of her and a blatant detour towards the creative vision she had for herself all along. After four mixtapes and an acclaimed debut album, it was Tinashe's time.

But her label seemed to have other plans. The project, which was originally slated to drop months ago, has continued to face delays as RCA Records has danced around a release date. The young songstress, earlier this year, pulled herself from her praised Joyride tour to get back into the studio to put the finishing touches on the much-anticipated follow-up to 2014's Aquarius but since then, rumors have swirled that things haven't been running so smoothly behind the scenes with her label strong-arming any advancement.

Taking the album title to new levels, Tinashe has refused to remain stagnant despite any situational dilemmas. This spring, DJ Khaled invited the talented starlet on stage to open for Beyonce's Formation World Tour in New York, where she showed off her noted melodious pop vocals and sharp choreography to a welcoming crowd, before making headlines with a memorable iHeartRadio performance. It's moments like these, Tinashe more than regains control - she seizes it.

Now, Tinashe's new single 'Super Love' will be released on Friday.

You're always taking on a lot. It's evident you give your all to everything you've taken on from your music to your world tours. How do you stay so happy and healthy while balancing what you're doing and what you want to do?

I think I just try and stay as happy and healthy as I possibly can. That's a big focus of mine is just general quality of life. Everywhere I go, I try and have fun and I try and surround myself with good people. I try to have a team full of people who have good energy and good vibes. I give a lot of credit to my fans, because they really inspire me every day. Every time I go on stage, they really help me deliver this emotion that even on my tired days, I don't necessarily know where it comes from. For me, it's a lot of factors, but I just try and generally drink a lot of water and eat my vitamins.

You stay super connected to your fans. You give them great shows, you give them tour diaries, you talk to them on social media, you follow them all. You've got an army. What integral role have your fans played in the creative decisions that you've made leading into this next phase of your career with the release of the album?

I think in terms of creatively, they inspire me by giving me motivation and energy. But I think the biggest person that I'm happy with staying true to on this album with the image and creating the music in general, is myself and making sure I follow my instincts and create the music that I want to create at the end of the day.

The world is awaiting for Joyride. You've stated previously that this album is an evolution. How is this new project a direct reflection of this personal and artistic change you've gone through this past while, since Aquarius?

I think I've experienced a ton of new things over the past few years, just traveling to new places and doing so many shows. I've grown a lot as a person. I've grown a lot as an artist. I've learned a lot as a performer. So I think that is reflected in the music. You can hear the evolution and the change in me. I think there's a natural progression in everyone throughout their lives and its exciting.

I know the main body of work is finished and that you continue to make changes and are being quite meticulous with it. Why have you chosen to be so specific with this? As in, what is a perfect album to you at this point in your career?

I'm not exactly sure that everything will be that obvious for me. I think that sometimes, when you know, you just know. Sometimes when you hear a song, and you know the album's finished, you just know it's finished. And I don't think it's finished at this point. Eventually, you reach a point where you just need to release it to the world anyways, because I'm a perfectionist and I almost always have things that I want to improve upon and perfect. I think I always just figure things out later. There's been records that I've created later down the line or after certain situations have happened that really been important to me and important to my growth. So sometimes, you just never know when that record will come and what will inspire that record. That's why, as a creative person, you always keep writing and always keep creating. It doesn't just stop at any point.

Where would you say you are creatively?

I'm just at the point where I'm trying to write for fun and not necessarily writing because of pressure and not trying to meet a deadline with the project. I feel like the project is what the project is at this point.

The media have this narrative when it comes to Joyride about this phase they think you're in between R&B and heading into this new realm of mainstream pop and then I talk to you and you seem super casual about just creating good music that reflects who you are. What's your interpretation of it?

That's maybe the missing piece like, something that feels more pop-leaning approach is less authentic and I don't think that's the case. I still view all my music coming from an equally authentic place and that's why to me, I don't see it as this pop evolution. I see it more as my artistic evolution. It's not that I've changed. I would never expect anything to stay the same. I think that's what the narrative is missing there is just that there's no lack of authenticity when deciding to go in a new direction.

That's very well said, especially when it comes to women breaking out of a box they were put in. It's always, "Taylor Swift went from making country music to pop music." Why can't we be genre-blenders as well without it being a thing?

Exactly. I think that that's exciting. All artists should have that freedom to grow and evolve and not just use the same formula all the time. That's why we're artists. We're creative people. That's very important for me.

You've stated that following your dreams and going after what you want is the underlying message with Joyride. What are you making happen for yourself this time around that you weren't able to achieve with Aquarius and past projects?

I think it's the level of decisiveness. I think it's a boss-ass bitch mentality. This isn't my first time around. I've been through this. I've experienced this. I've put out an album, I've been on tour. I've seen the world and this time around, I'm going to do it better. I'm going to be more experienced and to hone in on what I really want to do and that's really the biggest difference. But at the same time, I'm still taking so much in and I'm still learning so much. I think that that's really what Joyride is about. It's about experiencing life and taking risks and going after opportunities and not just sitting around.

You're collaborating with people like Skrillex and Diplo and you've said that collaborating took some getting used to. And while you've stated that you're very much learning from everything that's new for you, what do you think you're teaching your collaborators in the process?

I think that the biggest thing that I learned from collaborating with people is just to take in the experience, where that may be the creative process or just little gems they say within sessions. As far as what I think people have learned from me maybe, I think the biggest thing is that I have a perspective as a female artist and as a young woman that's not necessarily heard that often, because there is such a lack of female songwriters, female producers, female engineers in this industry so from a songwriting and production standpoint, it's really eye-opening for a lot of people to see that a woman is involved in that side of things and can discuss that side of things. I think that's really positive so I try and encourage as many people as I can to get involved in that aspect.

The title Joyride gives off such a freeing and liberating title. What has been the most liberating moment of your life?

I think probably releasing my first album. That moment where you have a project that you've been working on for so long and so hard and you're able to just give it away and release it to the world. I think that that's a really magical and special thing. It's awesome. Very liberating.

The name also has a rebellious side to it. I remember stealing my parents' car in high school and picking up my friends and going for a joyride. What would you call your most rebellious moment?

Probably just releasing music and saying things and being outspoken. Not holding my breath and not letting people push me around. Being a strong woman and standing up for myself.