So Johnny Marr said he’ll reform The Smiths if the government quit. Well that’s just what we need, more nostalgia acts. But just because something’s old doesn’t mean they’re past it; take this week’s other big news, Engelbert Humperdinck flying the Eurovision flag for Blighty – at least he’ll be better than Jemini, Six Chix, Imaani or any other previous young upstarts. Even the biggest stream was from a golden oldie - Bruce Springsteen’s epic Wrecking Ball (excluded from here because it’s seemingly everywhere else).

Also this week, the interwebs went crazy about a stream on NPR of Jonny Greenwoods and Krzysztof Penderecki’s orchestral collaboration; countless hipster bloggers implying they’ve always really appreciated the horse-haired nuances of avent-garde post classical symphonies. Well I haven’t, so I checked out the amazing New Build stream - a collaboration between LCD Soundsystem and Hot Chip - on Dazed Digital and an awesome stream of The Men’s new album Open Your Heart which has now sadly vanished. Not to worry, because we have eight more wonderful streams for you.

Tanlines – Mixed Emotions (npr.org)

You may have thought Vampire Weekend cornered the market of 80’s afrobeat, but Tanlines’ amazing debut shows the Vamp’s were merely Chevy Chase to this Brooklyn duo’s Paul Simon - such is the ingenuity to their rhythmic electro. Mixed Emotions is cooler than Tom Tom Club wearing a Wire’s shades outside CBGB’s with Abe Vigoda dropping by, and it’s airy production and urgent rhythms make it a wonder to hear.

VCMG –SSSS (Mixmag.com)

The first collaboration between Vince Clark and Martin Gore since Clarke left Depeche Mode in 1981 is a phenomenal achievement from electronica’s pioneers. SSSS’ beats are urgent and its punchy energetic synths warp around tumultuous bass. If these guys had stayed together modern electro would be 20 years ahead of where it is now. VCMG may just re-energise the superclub.

Iceage – New Brigade (brain-cloud.net)

Punk rarely sound cutting edge; use more than three chords or have a melody, and you’re a sell-out. Luckily Danish quartet Iceage opted to honour punk’s ‘76 dogma and play gritty, snarly, Ladbroke Grove punk rock. It has police sirens, loose cymbals and bass riffs direct from the pages of Sniffin’ Glue, which sounds timelessly authentic.

120 Days – 120 Days II (thelineofbestfit.com)

TLOBF, have streamed a peach of an album from these Norweigian trance-trash titans which could destroy dance floors and crush circle pits. Its building synths, splicing dramatic beats, are what Underworld can only dream of nowadays and Lindstrøm’s production on Dahle Disco ensures dance floors are pounded. This is the soundtrack of summer 2012.

Yellow Ostrich – Strange land. (pastemagazine.com)

Despite the awful band name this New York trio jovially resemble Death Cab for Cutie with a sense of humour. Strange Land’s breezy college indie quickly asserts it toe tapping intentions, and even tries a spot of tribal dance-hall on I Want Yr Love. It sounds delightfully American in a Say Hi To You Mom vein.

Torkelsen – Torkelsen (Nofearofpop.net)

This 22 year Norwegian chap’s electronica schizophrenically embodies innovation and safety with casual beats and drilling bleeps which, although hardly ground breaking, manage to create a carefree summertime glow. It can’t quite decide whether it wants to be jazzy-house, RnB or Warp-esque, but this allows for an intriguing record laced with mesmerising surprises.

The Stranglers – Giants (artrocker.tv)

Every struggled for conversation with your dad? Well why not discuss The Stranglers’ return to form for their nineteenth album. Filled with grooving bass and their trademark organs, Giants is a mature and Dutch weed fuelled testament to shirking the MOR limelight. Rather than being old blokes squeezing into skinny jackets, Giants is an enticing record of graceful craftsmanship.

Now Now – Threads (Spinner)

While some bands get carried away with effects and samplers, others stick with churning mid-tempo guitars, mainly resulting in Tribes. Occasionally though, soaring indie rock gives us a gem like Threads; a twee-rock record reminiscent of a humble Joy Formidable. Minnesota’s Now Now, could perfectly sound-track My So Called Life while resuscitating Belly with space dust.


Found a totes ‘mazeballs album stream? Then Tweet me @HiDavidNewbury