Today we catch up with Dede, Darren and Thomas from We Have Band to talk about the music that influences their musical existence. From Brian Eno to Iggy Pop, they picked some great records to talk about.



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Clor - Clor

Listen to the album by clicking here.

This is a record that we've all loved since it came out in 2005 and its extra special for us now because its also the record that brought Luke Smith to our attention as a producer. It was quite funny when Luke came over to my house with Thomas and Dede to listen to some of our demos because I have a Clor poster on the stairway! He was a little shocked at that. The tracks on this album are just so urgent and engaging the whole way but it has a patience and confidence that's really rare in a debut. It still sounds fresh every time you play it and we still DJ some of the tracks sometimes. Although its a shame they never made another album I think one of the best things about it is that sits alone without any other Clor record to compare it to so it doesn't suffer from any shadows of other work like most albums do. Thomas and Dede saw them play at Glastonbury and said the live show was amazing too, I'm sad to have missed that! [Darren]



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Pink Floyd - Meddle

I first got into Pink Floyd when I started college. Their music reminds of the time I was beginning to feel more like an adult than a child. One thing I particularly like about this album is unlike many of their later albums, where the themes and lyrics were mainly written by Roger Waters, Meddle had lyrical contributions from each member. This group effort, which included writing lyrics for each other, mirrors how we have written much of our material. On this album Pink Floyd were experimenting with different sonics, especially on the track 'Echoes' with various accidental sound effects. This inspired us to experiment more on this record  and I think the ambition and scale of Meddle is something to aspire to. [Dede]



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Brian Eno - Here Come The Warm Jets

Listen to the album by clicking here.

Brian Eno has been responsible for some of the music that has resonated most with me in my adult life. Early Roxy music and the majesty of tracks like 'In Every Dream Home A Heartache' and 'Editions Of You' owed much to Eno's sonic experimentation. The perfect cacophony of these recording and accompanying live performances signposted Enos debut 'Here Come The Warm Jets'. A pop album in the truest sense of the word the songs are immediate, tense, uplifting and driving. The production is startling and it was something we talked about before and during the production of our new record. We often referenced the drum sound on the title track, the way it slides in and out of the instrumentation. And always the melody pokes through. To do something so accessible and challenging really marks this album out as special. [Thomas]



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Iggy Pop - The Idiot

Listen to the album by clicking here.

I actually only heard this record properly for the first time while we were in the studio recording our new album. We'd often have breaks and we'd play songs to Luke or he'd play some to us and at some point he put this on and it just blew me away. Thomas and Dede already knew it well but I went home that night and bought the album and started listening to it a lot for the rest of the recording time. The whole album is just totally amazing and the bravery of the writing and recording is staggering. I've always found it good to listen to music that I think is incredible while writing because it forces you to push your own bar higher and higher. You're never going to think an idea is too much after listening to a song like Mass Production. [Darren]



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Blur - 13

Listen to the album by clicking here.

Not necessarily their best-loved album Blur 13 stands out for me almost solely for Graham Coxons guitar work. Guitars played a much bigger part in the writing and recording of our second album and all over 13 the guitars are just amazing. Never showy they underpin all the tracks brilliantly, although Coxon always gives the impression he could rip it in a heartbeat. Skipping through the record at almost any point the guitar counter melodies elevate the Albarn (and occasional Coxon) vocals. I saw a Blur show soon after the albums release and it blew me away. And at the 2009 Glastonbury comeback show more than 'Girls and Boys' or 'There's No Other Way' it was 'Tender' that really seemed to connect with the faithful. [Thomas]