Record Label Mercury Release Date 19/07/10 Link: Official Site Buy: Amazon You’ve got to feel sorry for the singer-songwriter, they always get put together in the same category despite sounding nothing a-like, only their gender in common (Florence, Winehouse, Little Boots). There has definitely been a greater surge from the females of recent years who seem happier to aim towards a more commercial market Alan Pownall is the new kid on the block if you hadn’t heard. The twenty-four year old Londoner is an ex-fashion student, who is well spoken and groomed enough to woo the girls, making him highly marketable. Having a friendship circle that consists of the major players in London’s bursting folk scene; Mumford & Sons, Jay Jay Pistolet and Noah & the Whale. Over he past couple of years he has been opening up for the likes of Adele, Marina & the Diamonds and Paloma Faith. Basically he is the ideal candidate for a major label to cash in on the latest trend. True Love Storiesis more adventurous than one expected. Although there is an old fashion sound to it, it is more towards jazz than anything, but dig a little deeper to discover more influences. There are elements of 80’s pop, infectious lo-fi influences The Strokes and American West Coast vibes on this debut. The Mercury released True Love Storiesopens with a chilled out ‘More or Less’ before kicking into the more upbeat sounding Clara with a feeling of a pop classic. Jazz influences are apparent in the more sombre ‘Too Many Holes’ and ‘Life Worth Living’ whilst ‘The Others’ has a 1940’s feel to it. Debut single ‘Chasing Times’ highlights the Jack Johnson influences whilst giving the listener a feel for summer. ‘Don’t You Know Me’ is the stand-out track on the album with a delightful and celebratory feel to it, completed with a chorus to clap a long to. The second half of the album is a lot more downbeat than the opening tracks which helps his lyrics stand out. Expect him to take Paolo Nutini’s crown for a bit. I hope this summery sounding album doesn’t getting annoying as quick as the British summer goes. Photobucket