Brighton has a mystical power all to itself, with its stony beachfronts, it’s winding, weaving lanes and the all-powerful element of the other, as the various interesting characters and individuals potter around the city. The same can be applied to Cave Painting, a quintet from the seaside destination, as they perceive something totemic and instinctive in the steady, energising thrust of their indie pop creations.

Latching onto an undeterminable addictive ethos, they submit a sound that echoes the recent output of Foals, an evolving math rock approach, taking on board elements of tribal pop and electronic flourishes. Their latest EP, You’ll Be Running Soon, is a journey into slowly developing grandiose statements, with each subsequent track taking time to build and build into a clattering smash of collapse and growth. Opener ‘Midnight Love’ gives no introduction, with Adam Kane’s unflappable vocal vigor easing the listener into the record. The folding and crossing of atmospheric synth, brooding backing vocals and heart thudding percussion cements the sound of Cave Painting; that of a band with time on their hands and nothing to do but ruminate on the notions of the universe that affect our miniscule lives on Earth.

The title could mean one of two things. You could see it as a seething threat, thrown out in some furious furor or, alternately, a defiant exclamation of positive vibrancy, urging the intended to push themselves and break free, running away into their own bright future. The music does nothing to solidify either direction, with ominous gloom contrasting with emotional sweltering, as choruses and finales aim to lift spirits and hearts. ‘Rio’ has the band sounding like some of Kings of Leon’s latest output, semi-jangles and pauses intact, but the wavering vocal and pulsing electric whirr push past this momentary worry into an atmospheric tunnel that leads to a sumptuously, and surprisingly swelling, sing-along ending. Cave Painting have the power of the pause perfected, allowing instruments to back away fleetingly, granting a reverential, solemn air to their music, with choral vocals and underlying synths grabbing the spotlight briefly enough to catch the listener off guard.

They close with something of a barnstormer in ‘Our Click Says Yeah’, a pulsating tangle of sounds that begins with the aura of a jumble sale of their previous tracks, rather worryingly. By the tribal beat finale, however, the generous assembly of melody, sound and dramatic instrumentation meld into a welcoming rhythmic cacophony. Cave Painting apparently came up with the name by chance, rather than by any deeply felt connections. But the ancestral, primordial imagery of our ancient predecessors gathering around hastily constructed blazes, smearing dyes and newly discovered colours over the walls of their natural homes sweetly echoes the simple grunt, beat and resolution of this collection of tracks. It may be that if you shoved the band back in time to hang out with some of these early humans, their campfire musical entertainment could merge into one gorgeously elementary explosion of percussive expression. Best get working on that flux capacitor then…