Why it has taken so long for a band like Ellen and The Escapades to break away from the somewhat introvert folk scene, I do wonder. And I know what you're thinking; with folk bands topping charts these days, Ellen and The Escapades aren't really the first band to break away from folk, in fact far from the first, but nonetheless they are bringing excitement along with All The Crooked Scenes. There's still that ever charming folk mixture of acoustic guitars, hushed vocals and even a beard floating around somewhere in the background, yet Ellen and The Escapades more than make up for the musical world of over-produced chart-trash boy bands that surrounds us. So what if the Leeds 5-piece may never top the charts, it's not exactly their aim, but with radio support from the likes of 6 music, they couldn't be doing what they want better.

Why it has taken so long for a band like Ellen and The Escapades to break away from the somewhat introvert folk scene, I do wonder. And I know what you're thinking; with folk bands topping charts these days, Ellen and The Escapades aren't really the first band to break away from folk, in fact far from the first, but nonetheless they are bringing excitement along with All The Crooked Scenes.

Perhaps wishing to prove their right of a fan base (which is in no means necessary), Ellen and The Escapades take a rather catch-you-out approach to the album. It seems a key feature of the album that as soon as a, dare I say it; Laura Marling-esque emotion pouring track pops up, we're thrown into a rowdy folk-frenzy, foot tapping and jigging aplenty. Opening track 'Run' may encapsulate us with its longing ballad-esque echo, but Ellen and The Escapades never fail to remind us why we love them as much as we do (or why you really need to like them), particularly in the form of 'Without You', as soulful and loving folk harmonies sit amongst driving guitars and whirlwind harmonicas.

We're not to be misunderstood by Ellen and The Escapades. It may seem that the on and off tempos of the album hint at inability, but there's nothing disagreeable about the subtlety of tracks such as 'Stone Bird' and 'Coming Back Home', perhaps not cutting-edge or straying far from the folk we know, but simple, comforting easy listening.

On the brink of converting the least folky of us, All The Crooked Scenes, doesn't entirely succeed. If only just one small downfall, 'Can't Make it So' remains slightly skip-worthy. The 5-piece seem misdirected, of course with the previous emotions of the album, be it upbeat or soft, the track lies lazily between the two. The traditional folk-features of storytelling are gone and replaced by a clumsily lyricised plod of a track.

All The Crooked Scenes is, perhaps, a little hit and miss, but on the whole there's a sense of understanding about that. Ellen and The Escapades do remain among the favourites of folk-comeback bands, popular among the young and trendy, and rightly so. The hit and miss style is maybe less of a hit and miss, and just a welcome showcase of folk's variations. Even if All The Crooked Scenes only hints at the Americana style excellence that Ellen and The Escapades are capable of, they still break away from the Sunday listening association of folk, shaving away the genre's timid, inclusive beard and standing up for itself.