As the eerily enticing extended intro to 'Diarabi', the opening track from Goat's 2012 debut World Music, twists and turns into the slightly less eerie but equally enticing main body of the track, it has already become glaringly apparent that this is a very impressive live band at work. Over the twelve tracks on Live Ballroom Ritual you are assaulted by a live show that is complex, bizarre and more often than not, brilliant. Goat are like few other bands around at the moment, or at least few other bands that have gained any sort of wide-ish spread recognition. They are at the forefront of experimental music and for good reason.

Following the excellent 'Diarabi', 'Golden Dawn' is like something from another age. They fuse together tribal drums, reminiscent of early Santana, vocals reminiscent of African tribal music, funk guitars and a healthy dose of 70s psychedelic rock. It really is the sum of its parts, each component amalgamated together effortlessly.

The band's playing is loose but on point throughout. Although coming across as totally free-form, there's a definite sense of purpose in every note they play. Despite more or less every song here being stretched far beyond its recorded length, very rarely does this feel tiresome. Whereas those who were around in the 70s may think that self-indulgence has been done and many others just shudder at the thought of it, it's rarely even an option these days. In musical climate where everything tends to veer towards a formula and where too many live acts just recreate their songs as they are on record, distracting us with glossy production values, the sense of adventure and old-school musicianship displayed by Goat is a more than welcome change in direction. This is original, invigorating music, played in an often overlooked manner. It's indulgent, but it's not self-gratifying. The listener is the one being indulged.

Trying to categorise Goat's music would be a hopeless exercise. Where one second they're unleashing the crazed psych-disco of 'Disco Fever', the next they're laying down the slow, infectious groove of 'Let It Bleed'. The groove is led by guitar work which is largely reminiscent of Tinariwen's Saharan-blues. Though influences are notable throughout, they are moulded and worked to fit within the band's own singular vision of fusion music. By the end of 'Let It Bleed', jazz trumpets have taken the lead and the song is off heading down a different road. Even if you've heard their studio work, their live set is still ridden with surprise turns.

It's a rare occurrence that a live album truly seizes your attention and presents itself as a piece of work to be judged on an equal footing as a studio record. Live Ballroom Ritual however, is one of those occurrences. Obviously, to see them live, with their masks, energy and grand sense of theatre would be even more impressive, but as long as you can remove that from your mind, you're not likely to hear many better live albums. Generally, live albums serve as a reminder of a tour you attended or as an addition to your collection of a favourite band's recordings. Obviously there are exceptions and great live albums do exist, but it remains hugely impressive for a live album to be this enjoyable. Especially when you don't know the band's work inside out. That is the true testament to a band's live credentials.

'Run To Your Mama' best embodies how good a live album this is. The huge guitar chord that beckons the song in really grabs you by the particulars and whisks you along with its primal energy. Where too many live albums try, and fail, to recreate the atmosphere of being at the gig with overly loud crowd noise and every bit of chat from the band, Live Ballroom Ritual makes the music the sole focus. As a result of this, you feel more like you're actually there than any crowd atmosphere will ever manage.

For the sake of finding some kind of downside to the album, 'Goatlord' is a bit dull and 'Disco Fever' should perhaps be a bit shorter. Other than that though, they've pretty much nailed it. Of course, by the very nature of the music, Goat will be far from everybody's cup of tea but it's a cup that everyone should try at least once.

The pinnacle of the album is 'Det Som Aldrig Förändras - Kristallen Den Fina'. It's an eleven minute amalgamation of everything that Goat do; and it just so happens that they do almost all of it really rather well. Its introduction and monumental riff could almost be on a Kyuss record and from here it meanders fearlessly into every corner of psychedelic rock. Put simply, it's fucking brilliant. That's also the best way to describe Goat and the best way to describe this album. Listen to it now.