Will Oldham a.k.a Bonnie 'Prince' Billy (and the other thousand palace related names that Mr Oldham goes by) I can't help but think of Jeffery Lewis and his ode to the great man on the classic track, 'Williamsburg Will Oldham Horror'.

Will Oldham a.k.a Bonnie 'Prince' Billy (and the other thousand palace related names that Mr Oldham goes by)I can't help but think of Jeffery Lewis and his ode to the great man on the classic track, 'Williamsburg Will Oldham Horror'.

"And on the L train in the morning,Iwas really sureIsaw Will Oldham/He was wearin' the same sunglasses he had on stage at the Bowery Ballroom/Had he come to walk among the Williamsburgers of his kingdom/and you might say now there's a guy who seems to have their world laid out before him/Or you might say, he's just a rich kid or a fascist or a charlatan/But either way you say it if you look at indie-rock culture you really can't ignore him/And even if at first dismissive, after some listens you'll enjoy him."

Whether you know anything about Jeffrey Lewisor not, those lyrics are as close to perfect as any review can get on Kentucky's most talented troubadour.

Reviewing anything is a tough game. The reason I say this is because depending on what magazine/website/blog you go to they will give you a different explanation as to how they go about reviewing a record, or more importantly, WHO they get to review it. Some say they try to get people that really love the band or genre to review it. On one hand thats great because they know what they're talking about, but on the other hand it may not be such a good idea. We all have our favourite bands that we'll defend to the death and often you get the sense that people reviewing certain albums have had their judgement severely clouded by that fact. The other route is to get someone impartial that maybe doesn't have much knowledge of the band/artist/genre, which obviously means less knowledge but maybe less bias. At this point I feel it's my duty to inform you of where I stand in the spectrum. I've been through my 'music nazi' stage and now I'm happy to inform you that I'm just a straight up music fan, only conforming to one specific genre, whichIlike to call 'good'.

Over the next week I shall be reviewing the same album every single day and I feel that on this, the first day, I should lay all my cards on the table and let you know that I don't know everything about WIll Oldham, or even that much to be honest. I own The Letting Go plus a handful of bootlegs and thats it, so don't expect a deep insightful review, just an honest one.

Sorry for the rambling but it's best to get that out of the way now!

The Letting Go was such a great record for so many reasons. Firstly it was the first time I heard a Will Oldham album all the way through and also served as the perfect soundtrack to my life at that point. Struggling to decide what to do with my life, the sombre and melancholy feel to that record seemed to echo how I felt. But Lie Down In Light is a completely different animal. Having only listened to it once (I'm rationing myself to one play a day) you would think that any form of summing up would be a bit of stretch and an unwise one at that. But already I feel that this record is a far more hopeful and joyous affair, kind of like the childlike hope that Devendra Banhart often displays, but a but more sparse and less pretentious.

So thats it for day one. No real insight into the album thus far, but expect more of that in the coming days.