Label: Leaf Label Release date: 05/10/009 Website: http://www.myspace.com/nancyelizabethcunliffe Folk music. If you didn’t like that first sentence, stop reading. For those of you that are left, I imagine Nancy Elizabeth would probably tell you, ‘I wouldn’t describe my music as folk music… but I grew up listening to it.’ And I would agree with her first statement, but sometimes it’s just not worth debating the definitions of musical genres. Instead, look at Nancy Elizabeth on amazon.co.uk and you’ll see Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought reveals the following: Bat For Lashes, Noah and the Whale, Andrew Bird, Bon Iver and Fleet Foxes. I think we could smear all of the above with the folky brush, and let’s not get technical because we all know what we’re talking about here. We’re talking pitched harmonies, middle-class heartache, mother nature, art school, fairytales and French literature. So I think you know already whether you’ll like this album; nevertheless, I understand some details would be nice before you commit to a purchase or dismiss Nancy out of hand. Well, Nancy Elizabeth looks like a very plain English girl. And that will make you more comfortable with accepting the idea that her music is indeed ‘beautiful’. She also recently collaborated with label mate Susumu Yokota, and that proves plain looking people can be cool. The label is also home to Caribou, which adds some further credibility by association. Her own music isn’t bad either. It’s a pared down composition, mainly using guitar and piano, telling more by what’s left out than by what is there. She has undeniable musical talent and an English choir girl’s voice I’m sure her family are very proud of. But no song will stand out and the album’s one dimension is ultimately a minus. Yet as each track quietly bleeds into the next, you’ll feel like laying down and falling asleep or maybe having a little cry. And I mean that as a compliment. If this review has still left you undecided on the question of Nancy Elizabeth, consider the following. Crystalline, sumptuous, steamy, sloping, sultry, swooning, twilight minimalism and chamber pop: just some of the sumptuously steamy adjectives and compound nouns I have read in other reviews. I thought they may help you decide. Rating: 6.5/10