Ronnie Scott’s Jazz Club has long been the height for musical talent. Since being opened by Mr Scott in 1959, it has played host to such great artists as Sonny Rollins and Jimi Hendrix. Their pictures adorn the walls as if supporting the great and judging any below-par artist that performs in this historic venue. Recent performers in Ronnie’s bar were rock n’ roll foursome, Scoundrels, who were no strangers to the venue. So were they supported or judged? Let’s just say, they belonged there.

St Katharine's Way

Opening with ‘Just Can’t See it Through’, Scoundrel’s don’t waste any time working toward a build-up, beginning with a relentless main guitar riff punctuated with an appealing and complimentary guitar accompaniment. ‘Just Can’t See it Through’ is perfect representation of the music Scoundrel’s create; energetic rock n’ roll influenced melodies carry throughout the song alongside captivating and immediately appealing anthemic lyrics.

Scoundrels

An excursion in which guitarist, George, is sung happy birthday aside, Scoundrels leave little time in between songs jumping from one dynamic track to next, many coming from their upcoming self-titled album.

Scoundrels

‘Gulf of Mexico’, the band’s first single from the album is markedly lighter than the tracks that preceded, as a result, one cannot help but attend to the lyrics even more. The woeful tune speaks of wishing to leave for different shores as their love pleads for them to stay. As the song slowly fades, the quietness of the audience is made apparent, illustrating just how mesmerising the song is.

Scoundrels

This silence created by ‘Gulf of Mexico’ is broken as the band goes on to perform ‘Sexy Weekend’, ‘Hangman’s Lament’ and ‘All on my Own’. “You’re gonna swing for what you’ve done” begins the outstanding ,em>‘Hangman’s Lament' a track featuring exceptional guitar playing throughout reaching its zenith in an instrumental as the song draws to a close.

Scoundrels

Scoundrels most definitely leave their mark on Ronnie bar, ending with the crowd pleasing ‘Porno’. With lyrics that range from the moving (“If I’d stayed I’d be half the man so please let me go”) to the peculiar but amusing (“Hush now baby don’t you cry, my head’s stuck up my ass and I wanna die”) and striking instrumental moments, Scoundrels demonstrate that they are a band that should be on everyone’s radar.