The eve of Monday 17th November saw the bluestastic whirlwind that is Dan Auerbach and Patrick Carney grace the stage of Bristol Carling Academy resulting in an all out lyrical shoutfest resembling mississippi mothers in their plight to control a city of rampaging children of the night. From the arrival of the first support band on-stage, a trois of laidback atmospholk is the only way I can describe them, singer self titled 'Jessica Lee Mayfield' + 2, came the inevitability of a slow start to the evening.  This saying, the band, encompassing a giant bearded faced drummer, a pre-beat gen san fran guitarist and an ethereal mishamasha of a soft singing semi lucid frontgirl, were an extremely pleasant listen.  Although the crowd were waiting wantingly for fuzzy solo frenzies their acceptance and love of many a musical genre allowed for a static, quiet, and subdued viewing experience as if floating on a cloud awaiting the inevitable fall with the rain, which came with the deux of 'Liam Finn'. 'Liam Finn' comprised of an enigmatic auzzy/kiwi duo, front man (Liam Finn) (performed on 'The Late Show', 'The Late Late Show' and 'Later With Jools Holland') front girl (Eliza-Jane Barnes), saw to the uprising of an electric atmosphere with loopstation antics a plenty.  Liam gracefully switched from guitar to drums on many an occasion with EJ's interludes of random string instruments, percussion and sweeping vocal harmonies. all pertaining to a rising atmosphere of tapping feet and swaying bodies.  This was the fall of the rain, the earthly collision resulted in a blues beat patter of rhythm and soul known only as 'The Black Keys'...
Dan Auerbach
My first thought the moment this incredibly powerful fuzzy-blues rock duo journeyed upon the stage took the form of, "Dan cut his hair, why would he do such a thing!" but this passed the very second the epic 'Girl Is On My Mind' echoed out through the venue, closely followed by tracks from their first album 'The Big Come Up' and also many a melody from 'Rubber Factory' with tracks from 'Attack & Release - Same Old Thing', their current LP, rearing their head.  By the time the middle of their performance passed, the crowd had turned from one of relaxed contemplation to one of jumping lunacy, certainly where two dear friends and I were standing.  but woe is us, we seem to be the seeds of 'mosh-pitting' even though we wish for anything but. (radiohead and drunken glaswegians come to thought).  A mosh pit at a keys gig! blues is for the soul inside, not the twat inside.  Sweeping generalisation? I think not.  But it did almost bestow me with a kiss from a pretty eyed girl who thought I may have had the joint she smelled, I thought of lying for the split second before i realised she was their to mosh, 'I still have the taste upon my lips, care to try' came to mind, alcohol and dirty blues makes drunken girls more susceptible to dodgy chat up lines right? Well, it was not to be, the only negative of the night.  One of my highlight of the night though, had to have been the magnificent Junior Kimbrough cover 'Everywhere I Go' from the album 'Thickfreakness' that had everyone swaying to an intrasensory injection of old skool Mississippi blues, even the moshers.  The gig had passed with no more than 10 words of thought escaping Dan's lips between songs, none from Patrick, but this was of little circumstance for a band who let their music speak for itself, and speak it did, for even after the chase for our last train home, exercise that I had very much not envisioned, I was left with their narrative on my mind and cadence in my heart... Conclusion - For a band I love so much, I will always be hard-pressed to give them any less than an incredible performance, if you get the chance, do not let this band pass you by.