Label: Bubbles Release Date: 30/03/09 Link: www.myspace.com/thewhitestboyalive The Berlin-based ex-dance group are back with a second instalment of clean-cut indie sounds in what seems like a 'part two' to their first album, Dreams. The band show barely any signs of moving on from what they released two years ago at first, especially with similar styled art work, but it turns out that they are going through quite a steady transition. The Whitest Boy Alive started out as a dance project and there are the odd hints in Dreams that they're trying to return to that format, but the album remains a down-tempo pop record on the whole. In Rules however, they break out of this mould with a lot more dance rhythms. As I listened to this I still struggled to imagine it being played in a club, and I still think it would be suicide for a DJ to play the Whitest Boy Alive songs to a crowd, which leads me to think of a genre that I never thought I would bring up to describe a band that I like. There has long since been a moment when a critic has had the pretentious nerve to name some musicians as the saviours of something, so I will break that absence now and say that The Whitest Boy Alive are the saviours of lounge music. That doesn't necessarily sound like a good thing; lounge music is after all the least desirable genre one can pursue. Even prog rock is better liked than lounge because at least some people actually bother to listen to it. Lounge on the other hand, provides a soundtrack to the awkward silences in lifts, and can often be heard in hotel lobbies or tacky restaurants, being played by a man at a piano, in a cheap tuxedo with a wig and a fake tan. But, the Whitest Boy Alive have taken this much unspoken genre and breathed life into it; they are what Steely Dan would have been with real instruments, or what Jamiroquai would have been with real funk and songs that don't all sound the same. If the songs from Rules and even a few from Dreams were to be played in a long ride on the elevator, while you're waiting to be put through to a phone operator, or in one of those godforsaken American bars with a name like, 'The Starlight Room', or, 'Lounge Paradiso', the world would be a lot more exciting place.  7/10