Tramlines' Facebook page was a fun place to be on Thursday night when the festival announced Wu-Tang Clan had cancelled their appearance (along with all their other European dates). A few people tried to sell tickets, many felt the need to moan and one man suggested that Tramlines had never booked Wu in the first place and the whole thing was a scheme to get unsuspecting people to buy tickets. Thankfully, most of the crowd saw sense and saw that Tramlines (19 wristbanded venues and possibly hundreds of fringe venues), a three-day festival across the width and breadth of Sheffield, had a little more to offer. A day later Tramlines announced two notable replacements - Mob Deep and De La Soul, and the mob seemed mollified.

Both acts put in notable performances, drawing crowds despite the Sunday rain. Now in its sixth year, Tramlines has put its formative years behind itself to seek the title of best urban music festival. The festival is far more than its headliners, but each year it has attracted bigger names to top the bill. This year The Charlatans and Basement Jaxx both drew people from the city centre to the main stage's new (and bigger) venue. Basement Jaxx's stage show has been regarded as one of the best in the business for a while now, and Buxton and Ratcliffe certainly proved why on Saturday night as they were joined on stage by a host of dancers as they played through a career spanning set that included hits from 1999's Remedy through to last year's Junto.

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I spent Friday night at a friend's pub, soaking up the festival's fringe vibes rather than making the trip to the main stage to watch The Charlatans. The beauty of Tramlines is getting caught up in the festival's energy in the most unusual places; I watched local DJ duo North N South invite friends to share the decks under some shoddily constructed tarp in a beer garden. Scott Bethell (Soul Jazz Records) made the trip up from London and all night the venue's courtyard was alight with a party atmosphere as classics like Dead Prez and DJ Blaqstarr & Rye Rye dropped alongside more modern offerings like MIA and Daniel Avery.

Saturday boasted the biggest, and most eclectic billing - Tramlines working hard over the years to give DJs as much focus as bands and solo artists. Having said that, I started my day at the city's Cathedral as people sat cross-legged on the floor to watch local free spirit Jim Ghedi's thoughtful instrumental guitar pieces.

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Other Saturday highlights included Best Friends' set at Devonshire Green stage (the only one of their three outings I was fortunate enough to see) Their hooky, sunshine sound float around with an air of simplicity but hard work and consideration has been poured into their debut record that addresses wrestling, drinking and holy mountains. 'Cold Shapes' and 'Happy Anniversary' particularly pleased the swelling crowd.

Spoilt for choice on Saturday night I headed for Queens Social Club to check out Warp's Nozinja. The venue is a real working men's club kitted out like a school hall and smells like a sweaty nativity play. The venue bounced along to the 193BPM tracks as Nozinja and his dancers egged them on. The Warp DJ even took to social media to declare promoters Banana Hill 'always have the best crowds.'

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The highlight of the weekend was, for me, Nao's set at The Harley. I've been a fan of her's for some time and her February 15 EP is probably the best record I've bought this year. The venue fleshed out as her set went on (Basement Jaxx finishing just before the start of her set) and by the end of her succinct set the whole crowd were sweating and smiling, much like Nao herself. I'm sure there's more material on the way from the London singer, and if it all sounds half as good as tracks like 'Firefly' and 'Zillionaire' then the world is in for a treat.

Sundays at Tramlines are always tough, but thankfully the programmed music starts a little later. I saw The Downtown Roots, a local three-piece blues rock outfit led by Moz Casserly who can shred a guitar like a cheese grater. The crowd in the City Hall's Ballroom was much bigger than I expected as my hungover ears were pummeled with fine Sheffield blues.

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The Big Moon were musically sound, but their stage presence, or lack of, let them down a little. I'm going to put it down to my high expectations as everyone else seemed unfazed. Having only heard a handful of their material it was great to see them storm through a full set and know their talents extend beyond the catchy 'Sucker'.

I couldn't face a third night out on the Sunday and was forced to abandon plans to see Ekkah but on the way home - walking across the city - I realised just how much Tramlines has grown. The smorgasbord of talent that sweeps genres in undeniable and there's something for everyone to partake in. The festival is no longer the Sheffield secret I imagine it to be. In many ways, I'm like a mother who can't see what her child has become.

It's really irrelevant how people spent their three days at Tramlines. Whether they sat in the woods, stood in bars, relaxed in fields or stumbled through Sheffield's warehouse - Tramlines showed off Sheffield's best sides, all of them.

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