Founded in 2015 by Brice Partouche, Satisfy was created in honour of that moment in a run when the process falls apart and you sort of lock into a rhythm - or as Partouche puts it: The High. This, combined with his love of youthful rebellion, is what informs the design. And oh boy, is it beautiful.

On first glance, you'd be forgiven for thinking that Kanye West had applied his love of the apocalypse to the running sphere, but Partouche's vision is more industrial than say Waterworld. This is evident with their latest campaign, Run! Punk Run!, which was inspired by Joe Strummer of The Clash fame: "I found this photo of Joe standing on the start line of the 1983 London Marathon in a cut-off cotton tee and short-shorts, mohawk drenched in rain," explains Partouche. "I was eventually able to track down the photographer – Steve Rapport, who was taking photos for Rolling Stone. Steve serendipitously found Joe on the starting line of the race and captured the moment perfectly – this punk kid going for a run, no training, no entourage. I love that."

We didn't manage to get our hands on any gear from the Run! Punk Run! campaign, but what they did send over was impressive. Take their Long Distance Shorts for example, they manage to feel luxurious, yet totally functional (they breathe beautifully). And not to mention, they look incredible.

Once you start piecing the items together, you'll realise that Satisfy are clearly in a league of their own in terms of design and quality. Sure, the gear is on the expensive end of the spectrum, but buyer's remorse isn't something you'll experience if you invest in this company.

We spoke to Partouche about how the company started, all the way through to what he has planned for the future. Read on below.

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Could you tell us a bit about why you decided to create Satisfy?

When I found running in my 30s after a lifetime of skateboarding and drumming I was surprised to discover a familiar sensation – rhythm coupled with meditation – The High. I immediately became addicted and identified myself as a runner. The problem was that unlike skating or playing in a band there were no cool subculture brands in running. Nobody was making super technical running garments that encapsulated The High. So I made one.

In an interview with Gear Patrol, you said the company wasn't "imprisoned by the same artificial straight jacket as the large players in the industry." If the benefits of catering to a niche is flexibility, what would you say are the negatives?

It’s true that like any challenger brand we are more agile than our competitors. Our atelier-style production process ensures we have complete control of a garment from initial design to final production and since we are not catering to a watered-down, G-rated mainstream we are able to take greater creative risk and take on the role of the avant-garde. The greatest challenge in this is that we are the pioneers. The marketplace hasn’t really evolved yet and we don’t have competitors so we need to rely completely on our own instincts on where to go and what to do next. Still, I see this as more of an opportunity than a downside.

How does the design process work for you? Specifically the balance between the aesthetic and the functionality that most runners might expect.

Essentialism informs everything we do. When I design I think about how to best remove physical and visual distraction to create a clearer path to The High. In fact, the design process for me is mostly editing – trying to strip away as much as possible from a garment except what is absolutely necessary for running. This type of minimalist design becomes even more powerful when combined with a clear aesthetic narrative. My take on the running subculture is subjective, but it offers a voice to those who share similar cultural references of rebellion, solitude and romanticism. Strong subcultures with connections to film, music and art have always existed in running. We’re just exposing them, bringing them to light.

Satisfy

Image courtesy of Satisfy©

What outside influences, if any, do you bring to the table when you think about Satisfy?

I grew up in the French Alps, skating and playing drums, so I always fantasized about the Californian utopia you see in the movies and the nouvelle-vague Americana from '1970s film and music. I’m deeply inspired by youth rebel movements, which is part of what drew me to running in the first place. In the '70s running was a rebellious act, a lot like skating, punk music and surfing. I love taking iconic pieces from these movements and reinterpreting them for running - concert merch becomes a marathon finisher tee… studs from a motorcycle jacket become the reflective "studs" on a windbreaker.

Could you talk us through the Run! Punk! Run! series?

Our new collection Run! Punk Run! is inspired by Joe Strummer, frontman of the Clash and his rogue foray into marathon running during the height of his fame. I found this photo of Joe standing on the start line of the 1983 London Marathon in a cut-off cotton tee and short-shorts, mohawk drenched in rain. I was eventually able to track down the photographer – Steve Rapport, who was taking photos for Rolling Stone. Steve serendipitously found Joe on the starting line of the race and captured the moment perfectly – this punk kid going for a run, no training, no entourage. I love that.

What Satisfy piece are you most proud of and why?

I’ve spent a lot of time trying to innovate and perfect the holy grail of running shorts. There are so many functions a pair of running shorts need to fulfil, from facilitating the free range of motion, stashing keys and gels while remaining breathable, fast-drying, and durable enough to withstand a variety of harsh conditions and years of washing.

We started with the lining. I was looking for a fabric breathable and light enough to immediately release moisture while remaining strong, durable and flexible. After experimenting with every technical lining fabric in the market we discovered a silk maker in France who specialized in breathable fabrics for medical bandaging. What makes this fabric so much more breathable than others is that it’s woven instead of knitted and so the fibres don’t wick and hold moisture, they actually facilitate airflow through the garment so that moisture evaporates directly from the skin.

We collaborated with this silk maker to produce a proprietary technical silk fabric we call Justice™, which we now use as the lining for all of our shorts. Coupled with features such as double waistband for stashing keys and drawcords, sweat-proof phone pockets, expandable nutrition pockets and reflective prints I truly believe we make the best running shorts in the world.

Satisfy

Image courtesy of Satisfy©

If one album could sum up the brand, what would it be and why?

Raw Power by Iggy and the Stooges (1973). This album was the trail-blazing proto-punk album at a time when rock was in its progressive era. The songs on this album are intense, emotionally charged but also extremely restrained. There's real beauty in this kind of finesse and clarity - it's essentialism at its best. This is the same mentality which informs my design process - how can I strip away distraction to allow the runner to reach The High? I find the contradiction of creating intense emotion through stripping away environmental cues to the bare minimum very romantic.

Lastly, what do you have coming up that you think we should be keeping our eyes out for?

The campaign film for Run! Punk Run! drops this week and includes the new song 'Marathon Man' from Brooklyn-based proto-rock band Savants. We’ll be following the release of this film with a tour of pop-up events this spring, details soon to be announced via Instagram. We’ve also got an upcoming shoe collaboration dropping this Summer… can’t say who with yet but there’s already a lot of excitement from our partners and retailers about it.

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You can visit Satisfy by heading to their official website, satisfyrunning.com. We recommend buying as much of it as you can.