Although we've all grown to know and accept that whatever goes on the internet, stays on the internet, sometimes we momentarily forget that such premise is valid for things we happen to share "privately" (or so we think) via chat or any other message service, such as nudes. This may eventually lead to unpleasant circumstances, especially if those so-called "private" items are used as revenge tools by a bitter ex or even happen to fall in the wrong hands due to hacking.

That is the reason why Facebook has announced a very unusual measure to deal with this eventuality: as it has been reported by The Guardian, in Australia the social network is asking its users to send their nudes to the e-safety commission, which will then pass them on to Facebook, which on its turn will assign said image a unique fingerprint (called "hash") to identify it and prevent it from being posted. Not only the request is rather odd but also controversial, as people begin wondering why Facebook doesn't simply provide the users with their own hashes themselves so they can assign them to any content they like and keep track of when and where their photos are shared in the web.

Even if this is yet to be properly implemented, one can't help but wonder exactly how many people are willing to share their photos with the e-safety commission, knowing there will always be a way of a leak somehow. Bottom line here is, if you are not comfortable with the possibility of a photo (nude or other) you've sent someone eventually ending up online, you probably shouldn't share it in the first place.